Richard Lehnert

Four decades of tree fruit discovery

By |May 2nd, 2014|

The last 40 years have been fruitful generators of solid fruit tree knowledge.

Labor shortage favors imports

By |April 29th, 2014|

New study says a shortage of labor is hampering expansion of U.S. fruit production.

Michigan growers worry about labor

By |April 29th, 2014|

If nothing gets done to solve immigration issues this year, and, with it, assure a supply of domestic seasonal [...]

  • Mechanical pruning of fruiting walls. Dan Lagasse
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    Be careful in adopting summer hedging to build fruiting walls

Be careful in adopting summer hedging to build fruiting walls

By |April 22nd, 2014|

A Pennsylvania researcher warns growers south of New York, where trees grow more vigorously, that they might want to take a cautious approach on adoption of summer pruning and shearing to create fruiting walls.

New herbicide — resistant crops

By |April 21st, 2014|

Both Dow Agrosciences and Monsanto Company expect to have new herbicide-resistant crops and new herbicides available in 2015.

Dow is [...]

Four reasons to manage the orchard floor

By |April 21st, 2014|

Several forces at work suggest that orchardists should look more closely at how they manage the floors of their orchards and vineyards.

DriftWatch grows

By |April 21st, 2014|

pecialty crops growers, especially those who grow grapes, will have new cause for concern in 2015 when new genetically modified field crops are expected to come to fields near their orchards and vineyards.

Managing orchard weeds

By |April 21st, 2014|

Fruit growers are always looking for better, cheaper ways of controlling vegetation under the trees in their orchards, but, in general, weed control gets more expensive and more complicated.

Herbicide-resistance raises concerns

By |April 15th, 2014|

Specialty crops growers, especially those who grow grapes, will have new cause for concern in 2015 when new genetically modified field crops are expected to come to fields near their orchards and vineyards.

Organic matter that lasts

By |April 14th, 2014|

Tree fruit growers may one day have a new way to dramatically improve soil quality in low-organic-matter soils. Imagine being able to add organic matter that will last thousands of years, essentially permanently affecting soil tilth and structure, instead of the few years you can get using cover crops and mulches. The “new” form of organic material is called biochar.