April 15th 2014 Issue

Calculate target yield

By |April 16th, 2014|

Many factors contribute to the profitability of an orchard. The two most important factors are marketable yield per hectare [...]

Uncertain future for Meyer Orchards

By |April 16th, 2014|

Ron Meyer, nearing retirement and without a transition plan, sees a murky future for his pear orchard.

Kate Moser, Young Grower from Walnut Grove, California

By |April 15th, 2014|

age / 33
crops / wine grapes, 200 acres in apples, 100 acres pears,
business / Darsie, Hutchinson & [...]

In the Box

By |April 15th, 2014|

Puffer research
Dear Good Fruit Grower:
I am a University of California pomology farm advisor and have worked in the [...]

Growers face land constraints

By |April 15th, 2014|

Fruit growers in British Columbia , Canada, may still stand tall as leaders in high-density orchard systems, but they can only wonder at the enormity of the Washington apple industry across their southern border.

Herbicide-resistance raises concerns

By |April 15th, 2014|

Specialty crops growers, especially those who grow grapes, will have new cause for concern in 2015 when new genetically modified field crops are expected to come to fields near their orchards and vineyards.

Quick Bites for April 15, 2014

By |April 15th, 2014|

Apple Commission appoints officers

Barbara Walkenhauer of Selah succeeded David Douglas as chair of the Washington Apple Commission at the [...]

Chardonnay’s future in Washington

By |April 14th, 2014|

Chardonnay is at a crossroads in Washington State as the state becomes a red-dominated wine state.

Pay attention to the soil

By |April 14th, 2014|

Growers should pay more attention to the soil.

Organic matter that lasts

By |April 14th, 2014|

Tree fruit growers may one day have a new way to dramatically improve soil quality in low-organic-matter soils. Imagine being able to add organic matter that will last thousands of years, essentially permanently affecting soil tilth and structure, instead of the few years you can get using cover crops and mulches. The “new” form of organic material is called biochar.