March 15th 2014 Issue

  • A tractor mounted Darwin thinning device.
    Permalink A tractor mounted Darwin thinning device.Gallery

    Mechanical thinning can damage spurs, leaf tissue and flowers

Mechanical thinning can damage spurs, leaf tissue and flowers

By |March 25th, 2014|

Mechanical thinning looks like a ­promising technique for reducing the amount of labor-intensive hand thinning required in order to [...]

Pear grower Laura Naumes blazes a trail

By |March 25th, 2014|

Laura Naumes is the first woman to chair the Pear Bureau Northwest.

Bee renting tips

By |March 19th, 2014|

Smith helps growers and beekeepers come together agreeably

How bad things in the environment gang up and kill bees

By |March 19th, 2014|

The synergistic effect of pesticides in hives.

Is there a better crab apple pollinizer?

By |March 19th, 2014|

No research is under way to evaluate pollinizers to replace Manchurian crab apple.

Control leafhoppers to avoid virus

By |March 19th, 2014|

The risk of grapevine redleaf virus makes controlling leafhoppers all the more important.

Pollen tube growth model makes thinning more precise

By |March 19th, 2014|

Blossom-time apple thinning model explored for eastern growers.

Bees live in a toxic world

By |March 19th, 2014|

Planting more flowers would help solve honeybee decline.

Protecting your high-value crop

By |March 19th, 2014|

Orchard netting may be cost effective for high-value varieties like Honeycrisp.

Inspiration Awards presented to Yakima area farm families

By |March 18th, 2014|

Four couples from Mexico were honored by the Center for Latino Farmers in Yakima