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Owners change at Burrows Tractor  John Riel, who joined Burrows Tractor Company in Yakima, Washington, 32 years ago as a general helper, has bought the company. Riel started work there after graduating from high school. He became a mechanic in the service department, was promoted to service manager, and transitioned into sales, eventually becoming sales manager and then general manager. Burrows Tractor was formed in Yakima in 1939 when Burrows Motor Company was divided into two separate companies handling Ford cars and tractors. The car company became Valley Ford. William Kabrich, Sr., and Grover Burrows headed the tractor operation, which was at the time selling the Ford 9N tractor. Later, their sons Fred Burrows and Rex Kabrich became involved. When Rex retired in 1988, his sons John and Bill Kabrich took ownership of the company. In 2004, they opened a branch in Wenatchee, Washington, and expanded their product line to include commercial turf mowers and residential equipment.  When John Kabrich retired in 2006, Riel purchased an equal ownership position with Bill, who served as company president. Bill took semiretirement this July, and Riel became the sole owner and president. Riel said he expects the company to continue to expand to new ­locations. Burrows specialized at first in Ford tractors, which later became Ford-New Holland, and then New Holland. Other major lines it carries include Bush Hog mowers and Turbo-Mist sprayers. The company customizes tractors, for example making standard tractors lower or narrower for orchard use. About 80 percent of the company’s business is in the tree fruit and hop industries. The company has also worked with other manufacturers, such as Northstar and Edwards Equipment Company, to develop equipment, such as platforms, bin trailers, and brush spiders for orchards, and swing hitches and bottom cutters for hops. For more information, go to www.burrows tractor.com.  Topguard approved  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has approved the registration of the active ingredient flutriafol for disease control in apples and soybeans. Cheminova will market the fungicide under the brand name Topguard. It has both curative and preventive activity. For more information, check the Web site www.chem inova.us.com.   Thionex phaseout  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the manufacturer of enldosulfan (Thionex) are working on a plan to phase out the insecticide while giving ­growers options for shifting to other pest control ­practices. Makhteshim Agan of North America (MANA), the manufacturer, said in a press release that from a scientific standpoint it disagrees fundamentally with EPA’s decision to end all uses of endosulfan and believes that key uses are still eligible for reregistration. The company claims that EPA has made overly conservative and ­unrealistic assumptions about how the pesticide is used. “However, given the fact that the endosulfan market is quite small and the cost of developing and submitting additional data high, we have decided to voluntarily negotiate an agreement with EPA that provides growers with an adequate time frame to find alternatives,” said Scott Rawlins, MANA’s director of global government and industry relations. Endosulfan was first registered in the 1950s and is used to control insects on vegetable and fruit crops and cotton.  New Matrix   DuPont has reformulated its Matrix (rimsulfuron) herbicide, which is designed to provide extended pre-emergent control of grasses and broadleaf weeds in tree fruit and nuts. In the new formulation, granules are fully dissolved in solution, rather than suspended. In addition, the tank can be cleaned out more quickly and with less water, leaving practically no residue, according to DuPont.  Brandt acquires Monterey  Brandt Consolidated, Inc., has acquired Monterey AgResources, headquartered in Fresno, California. Both companies formulate, package, and market specialty products and chemicals for agriculture. John Salmonson, president of Monterey AgResources, and Tom Thomson, vice president, will continue to operate the company under the agreement with Brandt and will retain a minority share in the company. Brandt was founded in 1953 by Glen Brandt and his sister Evelyn Brandt Thomas in Illinois. Its products include the foliar nutrient delivery system Manni-Plex. For information, check the Web site at http://brandt-inc.com.

Owners change at Burrows Tractor

John Riel, who joined Burrows Tractor Company in Yakima, Washington, 32 years ago as a general helper, has bought the company.

Riel started work there after graduating from high school. He became a mechanic in the service department, was promoted to service manager, and transitioned into sales, eventually becoming sales manager and then general manager.

Burrows Tractor was formed in Yakima in 1939 when Burrows Motor Company was divided into two separate companies handling Ford cars and tractors. The car company became Valley Ford. William Kabrich, Sr., and Grover Burrows headed the tractor operation, which was at the time selling the Ford 9N tractor. Later, their sons Fred Burrows and Rex Kabrich became involved.

When Rex retired in 1988, his sons John and Bill Kabrich took ownership of the company. In 2004, they opened a branch in Wenatchee, Washington, and expanded their product line to include commercial turf mowers and residential equipment.

When John Kabrich retired in 2006, Riel purchased an equal ownership position with Bill, who served as company president. Bill took semiretirement this July, and Riel became the sole owner and president. Riel said he expects the company to continue to expand to new locations.

Burrows specialized at first in Ford tractors, which later became Ford-New Holland, and then New Holland. Other major lines it carries include Bush Hog mowers and Turbo-Mist sprayers. The company customizes tractors, for example making standard tractors lower or narrower for orchard use. About 80 percent of the company’s business is in the tree fruit and hop industries. The company has also worked with other manufacturers, such as Northstar and Edwards Equipment Company, to develop equipment, such as platforms, bin trailers, and brush spiders for orchards, and swing hitches and bottom cutters for hops. For more information, go to www.burrows
tractor.com.

Topguard approved

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has approved the registration of the active ingredient flutriafol for disease control in apples and soybeans. Cheminova will market the fungicide under the brand name Topguard. It has both curative and preventive activity. For more information, check the Web site www.cheminova.us.com.

Thionex phaseout

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the manufacturer of enldosulfan (Thionex) are working on a plan to phase out the insecticide while giving ­growers options for shifting to other pest control ­practices.

Makhteshim Agan of North America (MANA), the manufacturer, said in a press release that from a scientific standpoint it disagrees fundamentally with EPA’s decision to end all uses of endosulfan and believes that key uses are still eligible for reregistration. The company claims that EPA has made overly conservative and ­unrealistic assumptions about how the pesticide is used.

“However, given the fact that the endosulfan market is quite small and the cost of developing and submitting additional data high, we have decided to voluntarily negotiate an agreement with EPA that provides growers with an adequate time frame to find alternatives,” said Scott Rawlins, MANA’s director of global government and industry relations.

Endosulfan was first registered in the 1950s and is used to control insects on vegetable and fruit crops and cotton.

New Matrix

DuPont has reformulated its Matrix (rimsulfuron) herbicide, which is designed to provide extended pre-emergent control of grasses and broadleaf weeds in tree fruit and nuts. In the new formulation, granules are fully dissolved in solution, rather than suspended. In addition, the tank can be cleaned out more quickly and with less water, leaving practically no residue, according to DuPont.

Brandt acquires Monterey

Brandt Consolidated, Inc., has acquired Monterey AgResources, headquartered in Fresno, California. Both companies formulate, package, and market specialty products and chemicals for agriculture. John Salmonson, president of Monterey AgResources, and Tom Thomson, vice president, will continue to operate the company under the agreement with Brandt and will retain a minority share in the company.

Brandt was founded in 1953 by Glen Brandt and his sister Evelyn Brandt Thomas in Illinois. Its products include the foliar nutrient delivery system Manni-Plex. For information, check the Web site at http://brandt-inc.com.