April 1st 2007 Issue

Last Bite

By |April 1st, 2007|

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The Northwest Fruit Exchange was still prominent on this label that featured the smiling Indian boy.

Turning traceability into profitability

By |April 1st, 2007|

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Recently enacted federal food safety and food security laws have brought increased recordkeeping to most food companies, from producer

UnderstandIng wine scores

By |April 1st, 2007|

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Amy Mumma, coordinator and instructor of Central Washington University’s World Wine Program, demystified the wine rating game during recent wine

Sorting technology

By |April 1st, 2007|

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Paul Koch knew what he wanted a presizing line to do—lower inventory costs, reduce labor costs, reduce costs associated with

Piecework motivates cherry sorters

By |April 1st, 2007|

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Cherry sorting is typically an unpopular job. Most people would rather pick, says Hugh Dendy, a Canadian who’s growing cherries

Real-time feedback

By |April 1st, 2007|

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One of the benefits of presizing technology is the ability to provide real-time information to growers regarding fruit quality, says

Cherries a world apart

By |April 1st, 2007|

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When Hugh Dendy travels between his cherry orchards, it’s a trip to the other side of the world—literally. For

Early cropping system

By |April 1st, 2007|

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Many growers in Tasmania are using the Kym Green Bush (KGB) training system for cherries, which is a modification of

New Zealanders adopt dwarfing rootstocks

By |April 1st, 2007|

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Good times led to complacency, says Craig Hornblow. In the last few years, New Zealand apple

Don't hesitate with a hot variety

By |April 1st, 2007|

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Sam DiMaria of British Columbia and other IFTA members look at Gala trees in plots at the Grove

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