June 2013 Issue

Table grapes part of Arkansas breeding program

By |June 1st, 2013|

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This is Joy, in a photo from Idaho, where fruit breeder Esmaeil Fallahi included John Clark’s table grapes in his

Peaches from Arkansas

By |June 1st, 2013|

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Arkansas plant breeder John Clark.
Photos courtesy of John Clark, University of Arkansas

New nectarine varieties and a peach variety developed by

Promising WSU cherry selections

By |June 1st, 2013|

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One selection showing promise in Washington State University’s cherry breeding program is an early variety that has better fruit quality

Smart cherry breeding

By |June 1st, 2013|

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Breeder Nnadozie Oraguzie stands in a Phase 1 block planted in 2011 and 2012. He’ll begin collecting fruiting data when

Summerland’s focus switches

By |June 1st, 2013|

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Summerland cherry breeder Dr. Cheryl Hampson’s objective is to develop cherries that are large, firm, and sweet, have good stems,

Stellar lineage

By |June 1st, 2013|

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The Pacific Northwest cherry industry is seeing the effects of a shift to self-fertile varieties in the form of higher

Career comes to late fruition

By |June 1st, 2013|

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For more than two decades, Dr. Tom Toyama quietly got on with his work as stone fruit breeder at Washington

WSU program focused on self-fertility

By |June 1st, 2013|

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Stone fruit breeding began at Washington State University in 1949 with the arrival of Dr. Harold Fogle, who had just

Bing dethroned

By |June 1st, 2013|

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The Bing cherry, long the king of the Northwest industry, is losing ground to the newer Canadian varieties.

In the 2000

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