March 15th 2013 Issue

Good to Know: Consumer expectations of apple quality

By |March 15th, 2013|

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Everyone has a favorite apple variety but what makes it so? How do Washington State University’s new apple varieties WA

Codling moth: It’s what’s for dinner.

By |March 15th, 2013|

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A sterilized carabid beetle before gut dissection.
Angela Gadino, WSU

Do you ever wonder what those earwigs, spiders, and other ground-dwelling predators

Promotion and management of pear fruiting

By |March 15th, 2013|

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Left: D’Anjou tree sprayed at two weeks after bloom with 80 ppm ReTain relative to an untreated control. Right: Untreated

The Top 5: What growers can do to improve pollination success

By |March 15th, 2013|

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Inspect the bees you receive. A strong hive should have enough adult bees to cover eight to ten frames.

Honeybees are

Developing a disease management program

By |March 15th, 2013|

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Washington State University viticulture extension specialist Dr. Michelle Moyer suggests growers consider the following when developing a ­disease management program:

•  

Conserving wild pollinators

By |March 15th, 2013|

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MARY ANN FRAZIER

Cornell University has a new publication called Wild Pollinators of Eastern Apple Orchards and How

Project objectives

By |March 15th, 2013|

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Five specific objectives for the ­Integrated Crop Pollination ­project are:

Identify economically valuable pollinators and the factors affecting their abundance.
Develop habitat

Kill the pathogen

By |March 15th, 2013|

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Apple scab is a serious problem in humid climates, and McIntosh is very susceptible. Lesions occur on both leaves and

Integrated Crop Pollination

By |March 15th, 2013|

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Honeybees have probably the largest and most loyal following of any insects in the animal kingdom. Honey is considered the

Apple name delights grower

By |March 15th, 2013|

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Bob Meyer, an apple grower in Toppenish, Washington, is one of the first in the state to produce Washington State

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