September 2012 Issue

Lake Chelan sparkles

By |September 1st, 2012|

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Julie Pittsinger checks on her four-year-old planting of Pinot Meunier, one of the grapes traditionally used to make Champagne.

Julie and

Sweet!

By |September 1st, 2012|

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Scientists are testing a sweet idea that might help organic cherry growers manage insects, birds, and diseases all in one

Grower makes designer compost

By |September 1st, 2012|

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

David Granastein, sustainable agriculture specialist at Washington State University, takes a close look at the ingredients in Kyle Mathison’s compost.

The clubs of Quebec

By |September 1st, 2012|

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Apple growers in Canada’s Quebec Province march to the beat of a different drummer. They are much more tightly organized

Apple growers’ union gives market power to Quebec growers

By |September 1st, 2012|

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

For a relatively small industry with annual apple production of about 6 million bushels, the apple growers of Quebec have

Arctic apples

By |September 1st, 2012|

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

The Arctic Granny and Arctic Golden keep their white flesh after slicing.
Photo Courtesy of Neal Carter

The core idea is simple

A plethora of pears

By |September 1st, 2012|

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Four pear cultivars—Bartlett, d’Anjou, Bosc, and Comice—dominate supermarket shelves across the United States, and they’re great pears. But do they

Soft spray program for pears

By |September 1st, 2012|

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Though a no-organophosphate codling moth control program is more expensive at first, it’s not long before growers are saving money,

Arctic apples get cold shoulder

By |September 1st, 2012|

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

The U.S. Apple Association, the Northwest Horticultural Council, and the British Columbia Fruit Growers’ Association have all stated their opposition

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page