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From left to right: Honeycrisp, Lady Alice, and Opal apples. <b>(TJ Mullinax/Good Fruit Grower)</b>

From left to right: Honeycrisp, Lady Alice, and Opal apples. (TJ Mullinax/Good Fruit Grower)

 

Many new varieties of apples are being developed or discovered around the world.

Often, apple varieties are referred to by both a variety (cultivar) name, and a brand name, which may be a registered trademark.

For example, Cosmic Crisp, Jazz, and SweeTango are the brand names for WA 38, Scifresh, and Minneiska respectively. In some cases, the variety name is used during the growing phase, and the brand name is used for the fruit when it goes to market.

Occasionally, multiple brand names are used for fruit of the same variety. For example, Milwa apples are sold as Diwa or Junami.

Here is a selection of varieties representing most of the alphabet, listed by brand name.

VarietiesA-ZAutumnGlory

Autumn Glory Variety images in this gallery provided by respective marketing companies)

VarietiesA-ZRubyFrost

RubyFrost Variety images in this gallery provided by respective marketing companies)

VarietiesA-ZDiwa:Junami

Junami Variety images in this gallery provided by respective marketing companies)

VarietiesA-ZPazazz1

Pazazz Variety images in this gallery provided by respective marketing companies)

VarietiesA-ZJuiciDelite

Juici Delite Variety images in this gallery provided by respective marketing companies)

VarietiesA-ZIsaaqJeans

Isaaq Variety images in this gallery provided by respective marketing companies)

VarietiesA-ZKanzi1

Kanzi Variety images in this gallery provided by respective marketing companies)

VarietiesA-ZModiPhoto

Modi Variety images in this gallery provided by respective marketing companies)

VarietiesA-ZCrimsonSnow4

Crimson Snow Variety images in this gallery provided by respective marketing companies)

Autumn Glory (Huaguan):

A cross of Fuji and Golden, this variety was developed in China by an apple breeder who subsequently moved to New Zealand. Regal Fruit International holds the propagation rights and Domex Superfresh Growers in Washington holds the U.S. commercialization license.

Breeze (Galafresh):

Breeze is an early-maturing red Gala sport discovered in New Zealand. Sage Fruit in Yakima, Washington, is the exclusive marketer in the United States and is partnering with FreshCo in New Zealand to supply the apple year round.

Crimson Snow (MC38 S):

Kiku Variety Management is coordinating the global commercialization of Crimson Snow, a chance seedling discovered by Allan McLean in Australia. The variety is being produced in Germany and Italy.

The Serbian company Agrounija is planting 75 acres of Crimson Snow and has exclusive marketing rights in eastern Europe. The variety is being tested in the United States, South Africa, Chile, and New Zealand.

Diwa (Milwa):

This cross of Idared x Maigold and Elstar was developed in Switzerland in 1982. It is sold under the brand name Diwa in Switzerland and Junami (meaning young friend) in the rest of Europe and the United States.

In Europe, it is managed by Inova Fruit of The Netherlands. Rainier Fruit Company, Yakima, Washington, holds the U.S. marketing rights.

EverCrisp:

The Midwestern Apple Improvement Association developed EverCrisp from a cross of Fuji and Honeycrisp. It is grown exclusively by association members in a dozen states, mostly in the eastern United States.

Golden Fizz (Asfari):

This blush-free yellow apple, a cross of Elstar and Delcorf, was developed by Better3Fruit of Belgium. ABCz, a company established by Carolus Trees and partners, owns the rights to the variety. In Germany, it will be marketed under the brand name Blondy and sold through farm shops.

Honeycrisp:

This variety was developed at the University of Minnesota from a cross of Keepsake and an unknown variety. It was patented in 1988 and released in 1991 as an open variety. It did not become very popular until after the patent expired.

Isaaq (CIV 323):

Consorzio Italiano Vivaisti (CIV) developed this small-fruited variety in collaboration with Kiku Ltd. It is a cross of Gala and a numbered scab-resistant selection and is in test plantings in Austria and Italy.

Juici Delite (13-82):

Starr Ranch Growers in Washington holds the exclusive U.S. license to commercialize this cross of Honeycrisp and Braeburn. Oneonta Trading Corporation is the exclusive marketer. It was developed by Regal Fruit International, which holds the worldwide propagation rights.

Kanzi (Nicoter):

Kanzi is a cross of Gala and Braeburn developed in Belgium and managed by Greenstar Kanzi Europe. Columbia Fruit Company of Wenatchee, Washington, has the U.S. commercialization license and Columbia Marketing International is the exclusive U.S. marketer.

Lady Alice:

Don Emmons, a grower at Gleed, Washington, discovered this chance seedling in his orchard. Rainier Fruit Company patented it and named it after the mother of company founder Bill Zirkle. It is grown by a few affiliated growers.

Modi (CIVG 198):

Bred by CIV, which also developed Rubens, this variety was named after the Italian artist Amedeo Modigliani. Production and marketing of the variety in the United States are under the control of the North American branch of the International New Varieties Network and the California distributor Farmington Fresh. The variety is thought to suit California’s hot climate.

Natyra (SQ 159):

This scab-resistant variety was developed by PRI Wageningen in The Netherlands and is produced in Germany exclusively by organic growers. It is a cross of Elise and a scab-resistant numbered selection. It might be released for non-organic production under a different brand name.

Opal (UEB 3264/2):

A cross of Golden Delicious and Topaz apple developed in the Czech Republic, it is managed by a company called Fruit-Select based in the Czech Republic. Varieties International of Oregon holds the U.S. license.

It is being grown by Broetje Orchards at Prescott, Washington, and marketed by First Fruits. The variety has also been planted in Chile.

Pazazz (DS 3):

This open-pollinated Honeycrisp offspring was developed by Doug Shefelbine in his private breeding program in Wisconsin. Regal Fruit International holds the worldwide propagation rights and Honeybear Brands of Minnesota is the exclusive marketer in the United States.

Querina (Florina):

Querina is a scab-resistant variety that was developed in France from American parents PRI 612-1 and Jonathan. It is an open variety.

RubyFrost (NY 2):

This new apple was developed at Cornell University, New York, from a cross of Braeburn and Autumn Crisp made in 1992. The fruit resists browning when cut. The variety is available only to New York growers.

SugarBee (CN121):

Regal Fruit International holds the worldwide propagation rights for this open-pollinated Honeycrisp offspring from Minnesota. Chelan Fruit Cooperative in Washington is licensed to produce the variety in the United States and Chelan Fresh is the exclusive marketer.

Tentation (Delblush):

A cross of Grifer (Blushing Golden) and Golden Delicious developed by Delbard Nursery in France in 1979. The variety is grown in New Zealand by Heartland Fruit NZ Ltd to provide off-season fruit for northern-hemisphere markets.

Wellant (Fresco):

A cross of Elise and a numbered selection. Owned by the Dutch Company Inova, Wellant started out as a club variety for supermarkets but was an open variety for those selling directly to the public at farm shops. It is now a totally open variety. Anyone can plant trees for a license fee per tree and sell the apple as Wellant.

Zari (1/1/174):

This cross of Elstar and Delcorf was developed in Belgium. It is managed by Better3Fruit in Belgium and distributed in Europe by Carolus Trees. It is not a club variety and can be planted by any grower who subscribes to a limited growing agreement.


Editor’s note:

First Fruits of Washington is the marketer of Opal apples produced by Broetje Orchards. In the printed article “Varieties A to Z,” published in June 2015, the marketer was incorrectly named. Good Fruit Grower regrets the error.