New approaches to frost control

The height of the vines influences how they fare during cold weather.

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Apple variety network

  • June 1st, 2013

Variety and cultivar selection is the largest economic decision a grower can make when establishing a new high-density orchard block where a thousand trees or more per acre are planted.

Win Cowgill and Jon Clements want to help with that.

The two fruit extension educators—Cowgill with the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment [...]

FruiTrivia: Test your knowledge of fruit varieties

  • June 1st, 2013

1  Which of the following cherries is not an offspring of Van?
a.   Lapins
b.   Stella
c.   Summit
d.   Sweetheart
e.   Rainier

2  The Honeycrisp apple was bred in?
a.  1961
b.  1971
c.   1981
d.   1991

3  Which cherry variety is the father of Bing?
a.   Black Republican
b.   Van
c.   Lambert
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  • Peaches from Arkansas

Peaches from Arkansas

  • June 1st, 2013

Arkansas plant breeder John Clark.
Photos courtesy of John Clark, University of Arkansas

New nectarine varieties and a peach variety developed by fruit breeder Dr. John Clark at the University of Arkansas are high chill and should be adapted not only for Arkansas growers but for more northerly production areas [...]

  • Table grapes part of Arkansas breeding program

Table grapes part of Arkansas breeding program

  • June 1st, 2013

This is Joy, in a photo from Idaho, where fruit breeder Esmaeil Fallahi included John Clark’s table grapes in his trial plantings.
courtesy of John Clark, University of Arkansas

Much of John Clark’s success as a plant breeder rests with blackberries, but he also breeds grapes, as well as peaches [...]

Promising WSU cherry selections

  • June 1st, 2013

One selection showing promise in Washington State University’s cherry breeding program is an early variety that has better fruit quality characteristics than the current Chelan variety. It could be commercially available as early as 2016.

More than 25 advanced selections are in Phase 2 of the Washington State University’s cherry [...]

  • Stellar lineage

Stellar lineage

  • June 1st, 2013

The Pacific Northwest cherry industry is seeing the effects of a shift to self-fertile varieties in the form of higher and more consistent yields.
courtesy of PARC

The Pacific Northwest cherry industry is seeing the effects of a shift to self-fertile varieties in the form of higher and more consistent [...]

  • Smart cherry breeding

Smart cherry breeding

  • June 1st, 2013

Breeder Nnadozie Oraguzie stands in a Phase 1 block planted in 2011 and 2012. He’ll begin collecting fruiting data when the trees are three to four years old.
MELISSA HANSEN

Breeding new varieties of fruit is all about numbers—it takes thousands of crosses to find one worthy of commercialization. Researchers [...]

  • Surround might deter stinkbugs

Surround might deter stinkbugs

  • June 1st, 2013

The brown marmorated stinkbug is a challenge to control for any fruit grower, and organic growers have the fewest strategies of all.

That’s why Win Cowgill and colleagues at Rutgers Cooperative Extension in New Jersey decided to test the effects of the kaolin clay product Surround on the stinkbug.

Surround is [...]

WSU program focused on self-fertility

  • June 1st, 2013

Stone fruit breeding began at Washington State University in 1949 with the arrival of Dr. Harold Fogle, who had just finished his doctorate at the University of Minnesota.

In 1952, by crossing the two red cherries Bing and Van, he developed the blushed Rainier cherry. The variety—WSU’s first—was released in [...]

Summerland’s focus switches

  • June 1st, 2013

Summerland cherry breeder Dr. Cheryl Hampson’s objective is to develop cherries that are large, firm, and sweet, have good stems, and are productive.

For the past 50 years, the focus of the program has been on developing self-fertile varieties. Hampson still prefers new varieties to be self-fertile, but if a [...]

  • Bing dethroned

Bing dethroned

  • June 1st, 2013

The Bing cherry, long the king of the Northwest industry, is losing ground to the newer Canadian varieties.

In the 2000 season, Bing represented almost 75 percent of the Northwest cherry crop. By 2012, cherries sold as Bing represented only 22 percent of the crop. Meanwhile, varieties from British Columbia [...]