New approaches to frost control

The height of the vines influences how they fare during cold weather.

ADVERTISEMENT

Bee Care Center

  • March 15th, 2013

Bayer CropScience has begun construction of its North American Bee Care Center at its headquarters in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.

The center is to be a gathering place for researchers, bee experts, students, and other visitors to meet with Bayer scientists with the goal of promoting and protecting bee [...]

No fruit, no funding

  • March 15th, 2013

The short fruit crop in the eastern United States last year had a dramatic impact on research and promotion programs organized under state and federal market orders. These programs are funded by checkoffs collected on a per-pound basis, so income plummeted with the reduced crop size.

In Michigan, where the [...]

  • Conserving wild pollinators

Conserving wild pollinators

  • March 15th, 2013

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARY ANN FRAZIER

Cornell University has a new publication called Wild Pollinators of Eastern Apple Orchards and How to Conserve Them, compiled by Cornell’s Mia Park with seven coauthors from Cornell, Penn State, and the Xerces Society.

The 20-page publication describes the habits of major wild bee species [...]

  • Good to Know: Consumer expectations of apple quality

Good to Know: Consumer expectations of apple quality

  • March 15th, 2013

Everyone has a favorite apple variety but what makes it so? How do Washington State University’s new apple varieties WA 2 and WA 38 compare with each other, and with existing commercial varieties?

Consumers and producers may not always agree when asked what characteristics they desire in a new variety. [...]

  • WA 38 will have a name

WA 38 will have a name

  • March 15th, 2013

The commercialization plan for WA 38 will be different than for its first release, WA 2.

Washington State University is finalizing a plan for how its ­second apple variety, WA 38, will be commercialized.

The university will send out an “announcement of opportunity” (similar to a request for proposals) inviting applications [...]

Food Safety Committee guides research

  • March 1st, 2013

The Pacific Northwest Food SafetyCommittee, an industry advisory group representing tree fruit growers, packers, and researchers, was organized in 2007 to guide the Northwest tree fruit industry and Northwest Horticultural Council on food safety issues.

Since its inception, the committee has worked with industry and university food safety experts and [...]

  • A new tool for IPM

A new tool for IPM

  • March 1st, 2013

In recent years, the use of insect models has become an important tool in pest management. Current models help predict key seasonal events in a pest’s life history, such as adult emergence or egg hatch. Pest managers can use this information to better time monitoring activities or the application [...]

  • For the birds

For the birds

  • March 1st, 2013

Preliminary estimates of bird damage to fruit crops made during 2012 show what fruit growers already know: Fruit production can be for the birds—at least a good part of it.

The estimates were made in the Pacific Northwest, New York, and Michigan as part of a $2 million project funded [...]

  • Stinkbug is strong flier

Stinkbug is strong flier

  • March 1st, 2013

The stinkbug injects saliva into the fruit and then sucks out the juice, causing brown areas in the flesh that can resemble bitter pit.
PHOTOS BY NIK WIMAN, OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

The brown marmorated stinkbug continues to spread, coming alarmingly close to commercial fruit-producing regions of the Pacific Northwest, and [...]

  • Air volume should match canopy volume

Air volume should match canopy volume

  • March 1st, 2013

As growers move to modern, high-density planting systems to improve yield and orchard management, they need to match the sprayer output to the modern canopy. The closely planted trees and narrow rows require totally different operating parameters than the large, traditional tree canopies of older orchards.

Since coming to Cornell [...]

Bug pheromone studied

  • March 1st, 2013

In tree fruit pest management, most monitoring and mating disruption technologies are based on phero­mones that female insects release to attract males. For example, sex pheromones are used to lure male codling moths to traps or in order to mimic females and confuse the males to reduce their chances [...]

  • Good to Know: New traps and lures for tree fruit pests

Good to Know: New traps and lures for tree fruit pests

  • March 1st, 2013

Generations of growers have monitored the key pests in their orchards. Over the years, traps and lures available to growers have evolved. Yet, the goal has always been to develop easy-to-use, sensitive, and selective trapping systems. Sorting through pails baited with fermenting fruit juice filled with a writhing mass [...]