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Which is better for growing apples, angled or upright?

Growers and researchers weigh in.

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Honeycrisp: Grow it, then crop it

Although growers want to reap early returns from their Honeycrisp plantings, they need to let the trees grow first.

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Spreading shoots of young apple trees

Proper spreading of shoots and branches is an important step in developing a productive orchard.

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Choose the right rootstock for Honeycrisp

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The ideal rootstock for Honeycrisp is one that promotes moderate tree vigor along with good productivity, says Dr. Terence Robinson, horticulturist at Cornell University, New York.

Many growers who are using the precocious dwarfing Malling 9

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Electric orchard equipment progress

Orchardists are showing interest in electric power, and it’s coming, slowly.

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The good and bad of deficit irrigation

Partial root zone drying deficit irrigation has potential for white varieties.

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Opal apple verified non-GMO

FirstFruits heads off confusion with a GMO-apple that might be approved.

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Microsprinklers for frost protection

Capturing the orchard heating power of freezing water.

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Growers benefit from Smith’s work

Tim Smith’s research has put money back in growers’ pockets.

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DIY spray trial tips

On-farm trials don’t have to be complicated.

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Integrated water plan moves forward

Diverse group proposes plan to solve water shortages in the Yakima River Basin.

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How to make every drop count

Simple changes made with inexpensive tools can greatly improve spray applications.

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Extension is 100 years old… and counting

With additional funding and new faculty, WSU extension is not resting on its laurels.

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Grafting workshop planned for early April

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Washington State University is offering a tree fruit grafting class by tree fruit specialist Gary Moulton in the second week of April. The two-part, hands-on workshop, held on April 9 and 12, focuses on steps

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Rootstocks do fine in Washington

Differences in rootstock trial were due to yearly climate variation, not rootstocks.

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Wine grape yields not affected by early leaf removal

Early leaf removal in white grape varieties has several benefits.

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WSU announces drawing for WA 38 apple trees

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Washington State University will hold a random drawing to decide who will be able to plant WA 38, the latest variety from the university’s apple breeding program, during the first two years trees become available.

Washington

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Fire blight control without antibiotics

Lime sulfur and fish oil can help as part of an integrated strategy.

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Mechanical thinning can damage spurs, leaf tissue and flowers

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Mechanical thinning looks like a ­promising technique for reducing the amount of labor-intensive hand thinning required in order to grow a good crop of nice-sized apples.

That’s the conclusion reached by a team of researchers from

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Bee renting tips

Smith helps growers and beekeepers come together agreeably

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How bad things in the environment gang up and kill bees

The synergistic effect of pesticides in hives.

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Is there a better crab apple pollinizer?

No research is under way to evaluate pollinizers to replace Manchurian crab apple.

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Control leafhoppers to avoid virus

The risk of grapevine redleaf virus makes controlling leafhoppers all the more important.

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Pollen tube growth model makes thinning more precise

Blossom-time apple thinning model explored for eastern growers.

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Bees live in a toxic world

Planting more flowers would help solve honeybee decline.

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Protecting your high-value crop

Orchard netting may be cost effective for high-value varieties like Honeycrisp.

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Michigan growers approve Tree Fruit Commission

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Michigan fruit growers voted to approve creation of a Michigan Tree Fruit Research and Development Program, which will be set up immediately (effective April 1) and will collect assessments on the 2014 crop.

Its purpose is

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New varieties stabilize the market

Consumers are buying more apples and paying more for them.

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New pests threaten IPM

Pest management programs have become softer and more stable over the past few decades, but new invasive pests could change that.

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A humble leader (Video)

Throughout his career, WSU entomologist Jay Brunner has turned science into economic reality for Washington State tree fruit growers.

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Attract and kill

Michigan researchers have designed a device for oriental fruit moth.

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Save money by applying pesticides where it’s needed

Perimeter sprays: Growers can save money applying pesticides only where they’re most needed.

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Bird vs. bird

Raptors seem to instill panic and lasting fear in nuisance birds.

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Scare tactics: Bird management

Birds know when fruit is ripe, and it’s hard to convince them to stay away.

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Stinkbug derails IPM

Researchers fine-tune methods to control brown marmorated stinkbug.

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Stinkbug monitoring tools are a high priority

Researchers aren’t yet recommending that growers trap for stinkbug.

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Be aware of residues from late sprays

In the future, growers will find pesticide regulations getting tighter, not looser.

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The latest on dealing with spider mites in vineyards

Two-spotted spider mite has the capability to develop tolerance to miticides in wine grapes.

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Wenatchee’s Cascade Analytical offers cleaning & sanitation workshop March 4-5

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Cascade Analytical is offering a two-day workshop March 4-5   for fresh produce packers & fresh-cut processors to provide information on  best practices learned from national experts and practical case studies.  The workshop fee is $300.

Learn

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Food safety workshops

Food safety experts will help build better programs.

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Managing crab apple diseases

Crab apple disease management starts in the orchard with pruning.

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Winter tests hardiness

The polar vortex of 2014 will test the cold hardiness of trees and vines.

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Know your enemy: Little cherry disease (VIDEO)

Different causal agents are involved in little cherry disease.

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Preventing storage rots

What you find at packing time started in orchards at harvest.

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Pear research never ending

Oregon State University researcher is retiring in May after studying pear diseases for more than 35 years.

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Clearing House to poll members on consolidation plan

Members of the Washington Growers Clearing House Association’s board of directors will discuss a tree fruit industry consolidation plan at their annual meeting on Thursday (February 20) in Wenatchee.

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Grape growers recognize industry leaders

The Washington Association of Wine Grape Growers recognized Rick Hamman for his viticultural skills and presented him with its Erick Hanson Memorial Grower of the Year Award. Hamman has assisted Washington grape growers since 1999 when he left Colorado State University as extension viticulturist to join Hogue Cellars in Prosser.

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Scientists trace red-flesh genes

Could red-fleshed varieties be developed for the nutraceutical industry?

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Blueberry trees?

Blueberry trees could be machine harvested, boosting fruit yields.

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Thinning doesn’t always boost cherry size

A research project to find out whether Ethrel (ethephon) could be used as a postbloom thinner for cherries showed that the material can reduce the fruit load.

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