• Cherries with stems

Cherries with stems

  • May 15th, 2010

The challenge is getting the cherry to separate at the upper abscission zone at the twig.

In the complex world of sweet cherries, one market is calling for light-colored sweet cherries with stems on for processing, and is willing to pay three to four times the normal processing price to [...]

Keeping cherry growing profitable

  • May 15th, 2010

A “dream team” of cherry researchers from across the nation is working on a project designed to help assure the profitability of the fresh sweet cherry industry in the future.

The project, entitled “A Total Systems Approach to Developing a Sustainable Stem-free Sweet Cherry Production, Processing and Marketing System,” was [...]

  • Clonal research takes years and money

Clonal research takes years and money

  • May 15th, 2010

UC staff member Jorge Osorio Aguilar weighs grapes from a Syrah clonal selection under test for San Joaquin Valley conditions.

To a grower, the right wine grape clone can improve yield, advance or delay ripening, and reduce susceptibility to rots. For a winemaker, the right clone can add complexity to [...]

Grape clones: Learn by doing

  • May 15th, 2010

Without published research on which grape clones are best suited to Washington State conditions, growers must rely on the experiences and knowledge of others.

Washington growers are encouraged to do their own clonal trials to learn what works best on their site, but should be prepared for many years of [...]

  • Moth poses little risk in Taiwan

Moth poses little risk in Taiwan

  • May 15th, 2010

Dr. Lisa Neven is studying the survival of codling moth larvae in tropical conditions.

There is little risk of codling moth larvae shipped in apples to Taiwan resulting in the pest becoming established in that country, research by Dr. Lisa Neven, insect physiologist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s research [...]

  • Compost tea recipes

Compost tea recipes

  • May 1st, 2010

Tweaking the aeration time, handling, and changing additives can create diverse compost teas—even though they were made with the same compost. Washington State University researchers saw differences in the microbial organisms, nutrients, pH levels, and salt concentrations of compost teas that all started from the same compost and water.

CeCe [...]

What are compost teas?

  • May 1st, 2010

Compost teas have been promised by some companies to be a wonder-all product, protecting plants from disease, increasing growth, breaking down toxins in the soil, enhancing taste of fruits and vegetables, and more. Though few of the claims are supported by science, there may be something to learn from [...]

  • Good Job

Good Job

  • May 1st, 2010

Apple Blossom Queen Margaret Robinson presented a plaque to WSU Extension Educator Tim Smith when he was named Apple Citizen of the Year 2010.

Tim Smith is Apple Citizen of the Year
Tim Smith, a Washington State University Extension educator for the past 25 years, has been named Apple Citizen of [...]

  • Organic matter matters

Organic matter matters

  • April 15th, 2010

Soils are one of the most complex biological communities. A teaspoon of soil has more than 180 million bacteria, according to USDA’s Hal Collins.

Managing soil organic matter is usually not a priority for most farmers who must worry about yield, pest management, labor, and other things that impact the [...]

  • Nutrition guidelines for grapes

Nutrition guidelines for grapes

  • April 15th, 2010

Dr. Joan Davenport, who has long championed the need for grape nutrition guidelines specific to the Pacific Northwest, is in the process of publishing an Extension bulletin with the new recommendations.

The long- awaited nutritional standards developed specifically for Pacific Northwest juice and wine grapes are in the process of [...]

Micronutrients for juice grapes

  • April 15th, 2010

Though results are preliminary, representing only the first year of work, a research project studying micronutrient utilization by juice grapevines has found that timing and the combination of nutrients can make a difference in plant response.

Washington State University soil scientist Dr. Joan Davenport and her colleagues at WSU’s Irrigated [...]

  • Mechanical thinning works

Mechanical thinning works

  • April 1st, 2010

The mechanical string thinner knocked off 15 percent or more dormant buds in this Santina block. Right: The Darwin string thinner.

Soft fruit growers in the United States are catching on to what seems to have been a well-kept secret in Germany. With three years of data by U.S. researchers [...]