Resistance is still a goal

  • January 15th, 2011

Published January 15, 2011
Mildew resistance continues to be a focus of Washington State University’s cherry breeding program. Breeder Dr. Nnadozie Oraguzie has identified another new powdery mildew-resistant selection from a cross made in 1998.

WSU scientists are seeking new sources of disease resistance and working to identify genes and [...]

Advocate for breeding program

  • January 1st, 2011

John Carter is known for his relentless dedication to goals.

Oregon grower John Carter has been involved in cherry industry trade groups and activities. But the one thing that stands out when talking to people about Carter is his passion for research, and, in particular, a Pacific ­Northwest cherry breeding [...]

Passion for research

  • January 1st, 2011

Cherries, with their sensitivity to rain at harvest time and market swings, are one of the riskiest and most volatile of tree fruit crops. John Carter may have lacked farming experience—especially with cherries—when he moved his family from southern California to Oregon 35 years ago, but he and wife, [...]

  • Tree IVs?

Tree IVs?

  • December 1st, 2010

This injector was tested with apple trees.

Might the airblast sprayer in the future be replaced by IV tubes jabbed in fruit trees?

Michigan State University entomologist Dr. John Wise decided to see if he could control apple insects by injecting insecticides into the tree trunk—much as landscapers now do with [...]

Nurseries need a tree counter

  • December 1st, 2010

Robotics scientists at Carnegie Mellon University in Pennsylvania set out to develop a device to automatically measure the caliper of nursery trees in the field, but found that a simple tree counter would be more useful for the tree fruit industry.

Dr. Sanjiv Singh and colleagues began to develop the [...]

  • WSU seeks to fund priority programs

WSU seeks to fund priority programs

  • December 1st, 2010

Dr. Jay Brunner

Washington State University will officially announce a major fundraising campaign this month to fund priority programs.

The university aims to raise a billion dollars over a five-year period, and already raised a significant amount before moving the campaign into the public phase. About 25 percent of the target [...]

  • Breeders seek input  from supply chain

Breeders seek input from supply chain

  • December 1st, 2010

The apple, cherry, peach, and strawberry breeding activities of RosBREED are located across the United States at university, federal, and private sector locations.

What do genomics and socioeconomics have to do with deciding which fruit cultivar to plant next year?  Until now, not very much, but that is about to [...]

  • How do platforms impact workers?

How do platforms impact workers?

  • December 1st, 2010

Kit Galvin of the University of Washington explains how she is studying the health impacts of platform work. Rolf Luehs (on the platform), research assistant with the Washington Tree Fruit Research Commission, demonstrates how workers wear monitors to measure their body movements and heart rate.

University of Washington scientists are [...]

  • An oddly grand apple

An oddly grand apple

  • December 1st, 2010

That Gala apple sport called Grand Gala apparently deserves its name, and researchers at Purdue University have found out why.

It’s because of a process called endoreduplication—never before found in apples—in which cells in the fruit carry out an unusual cell division, doubling the DNA in the nucleus but not [...]

Keeping the customer satisfied

  • October 1st, 2010

Over the past ten years I have initiated a number of research trials that, when taken together, tell an important story about the link between apple quality and profitability. I often quote my mantra that “we are in the food business” along with McDonald’s, Wal-Mart, and even the slow [...]

  • Low-volume prestorage drenching is attractive

Low-volume prestorage drenching is attractive

  • October 1st, 2010

Dave Rosenberger described how he tested the effectiveness of low-volume nonrecycling drenches for fruit going into storage. His audience included New York fruit growers and International Fruit Tree Association members on tour during the fruit field day at Cornell Agricultural Research Station at Geneva, New York.

The practice of drenching [...]

Ripe cherries are less likely to pit

  • October 1st, 2010

It’s generally believed that riper cherries are more susceptible to pitting than less mature cherries, but Dr. Peter Toivonen, postharvest physiologist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in British Columbia, said results of his research show it’s exactly the opposite. There are fewer pitting problems with darker cherries.

“For a lot [...]