Safeguarding Honeycrisp from storage disorders

By |January 25th, 2017|

Packers have options to help protect against Honeycrisp storage disorders.

Beating bitter pit in Honeycrisp

By |January 25th, 2017|

Researchers look for postharvest strategies to reduce bitter pit risks in Honeycrisp.

Seeing scald before it happens with new tool

By |January 25th, 2017|

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Warehouses employ a variety of strategies to prevent superficial scald from spoiling apples during storage, but, in most cases, the

Empire State Producers Expo: Thursday wrapup

By |January 19th, 2017|

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When placing the end post of your orchard trellis system, think of a game of tug of war.

The human body,

Grape and wine research review rescheduled for Jan. 30-31

By |January 18th, 2017|

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The Washington State Grape and Wine Research Program’s research review has been rescheduled for January 30 and 31 at the

Empire State Producers Expo: Wednesday wrapup

By |January 18th, 2017|

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A sparsely attended but lively discussion about H-2A guest workers highlighted Wednesday’s proceedings at the Empire State Producers Expo in

Where do you match consumer expectations?

By |January 18th, 2017|

Economists quantify importance of fruit qualities based on differing perspectives of producers, packers and consumers.

Problematic pairings with Geneva 935

By |January 13th, 2017|

Certain scion strains show mysterious tree decline symptoms when combined with Geneva 935 rootstocks.

How does smoke affect wine grapes?

By |December 30th, 2016|

Researcher tests the effects of wildfire smoke on grapes and wine

Finding the right people

By |December 29th, 2016|

Orchards and packing houses aren’t the only places in the fruit industry with a labor shortage. Universities also are struggling to hire researchers and educators needed to keep the industry ahead of pest pressures, prepared for food safety requirements, growing new varieties and in tune with emerging technology.

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