Put us to work for you

  • August 1st, 2011

I am fortunate to travel the country meeting with apple growers, packers, and other USApple members, and hear firsthand the issues and challenges they are facing daily. I am often asked, “What are the important issues?” and I want to provide an inside look at the challenges your staff [...]

  • Good Stuff

Good Stuff

  • August 1st, 2011

Jack Everhart, left, New Holland, Inc., congratulates John Riel, right, of Burrows Tractor.

Recognition for Burrows
The New Holland dealership Burrows Tractor, Inc., in Yakima, Washington, has earned membership to New Holland’s President’s Club in recognition of outstanding achievement in business facilities, management, sales, parts and service support, and customer [...]

  • Pear psylla pheromone discovered

Pear psylla pheromone discovered

  • June 1st, 2011

The newly discovered pear psylla pheromone is being tested in the field to find out how attractive it is to males. This mesh sticky trap has a septa of the chemical in the middle.
CHRISTELLE GUÉDOT, USDA

Scientists in Washington State have identified the sex pheromone of the pear psylla, [...]

  • Stinkbug spreads in Pacific Northwest

Stinkbug spreads in Pacific Northwest

  • May 15th, 2011

Wasps that parasitize brown marmorated stinkbug eggs are being screened in quarantine.
Bugwood

Apple growers in the Mid-Atlantic region figure they suffered $37 million in crop damage last year caused by the brown marmorated stinkbug, and that’s not counting damage to other fruits such as peaches, grapes, and cherries in [...]

IPM in peril

  • May 15th, 2011

For nearly 40 years, integrated pest management  has been the hallmark of progressive thinking in fruit production and agriculture generally. If you used IPM, you were on the cutting edge.

So imagine how surprised New York growers were when state funding for the New York IPM program was slashed in [...]

  • Cutting costs of IPM

Cutting costs of IPM

  • May 1st, 2011

Vince Jones at Washington State University is testing the new Z-Trap, which zaps insects and records when they were trapped. It might be possible to remotely identify the type of insect, also.

The key to integrated pest management is monitoring—knowing what is going on in your orchard.

“Monitoring is very, very [...]

  • Help needed for invasive stinkbug

Help needed for invasive stinkbug

  • May 1st, 2011

Brown marmorated stinkbugs overwinter in protected areas, emerge in April in the mid-Atlantic area, and lay eggs from May through August.

Entomologists in the mid-Atlantic states are still honing their pesticide recommendations so fruit growers will be prepared to battle the brown marmorated stinkbug this season.

While they think growers will [...]

Who’s eating codling moth?

  • April 15th, 2011

This article is part of a series on the multistate project “Enhancing Biological Control in Western Orchards.”

How big a role can predators play in controlling codling moth in fruit orchards? That’s a question that Dr. Thomas Unruh, geneticist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Yakima, Washington, wants to [...]

ARM studied in cherries

  • April 1st, 2011

In the cherry orchards of northwest Michigan around Traverse City, growers use a mixture of methods to control their archenemies: cherry fruit fly, plum curculio, and cherry leaf spot.

Some growers use airblast sprayers while others use air-curtain sprayers. Some run their sprayers down the middle of every tree row [...]

  • Does ARM still work in modern orchards?

Does ARM still work in modern orchards?

  • April 1st, 2011

Penn State entomologist Dr. Larry Hull has spent much of his 35-plus-year career perfecting and advocating a technique called alternate row middle (ARM) spraying for insect control. The technique started in New York, came to Pennsylvania in the 1960s, and quickly caught on and became widely used by growers [...]

  • Watch out for the good guys

Watch out for the good guys

  • March 15th, 2011

Researchers have been testing different types and colors of traps for monitoring beneficial insects. This white sticky trap, placed next to an insect attractant, caught many lacewings.
Photo by Geraldine Warner

New monitoring tools are providing a window into the biological control taking place in orchards, and it looks like [...]