• Wasps ruin cherry crop

Wasps ruin cherry crop

  • May 15th, 2010

The European paper wasp looks similar to a yellow jacket, but has a narrower body and longer hind legs.

Cherry growers in British Columbia, Canada, are battling a pest that last year forced several of them to walk away from their crop before ­picking.

The European paper wasp (Polistes dominulus) was [...]

  • Woolly apple aphid

Woolly apple aphid

  • May 1st, 2010

Syrphid fly larvae attack woolly apple aphids.

The woolly apple aphid overwinters as a nymph on the roots of apple trees, but can also overwinter on the aboveground part of the tree in protected areas on the trunk or main limbs.

In the spring, overwintering aphids produce live young that migrate [...]

  • Solving the woolly apple aphid

Solving the woolly apple aphid

  • May 1st, 2010

Washington Fruit and Produce Company planted alyssum between the rows of this new orchard to attract syrphid flies, which are good predators of woolly apple aphid.

Dain Craver’s plan to produce potted apple trees to sell to city residents was almost derailed by a bad infestation of woolly apple aphids.

Craver, [...]

Growers surveyed on pest practices

  • May 1st, 2010

Washington apple growers are adopting new pest ­management strategies and technologies including safer chemistries, in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency phaseout of ­azinphos-methyl (AZM-Guthion) in tree fruits. Because the new chemistries require more precise timing and better spray coverage, use of predictive models and improved application delivery [...]

  • Research viewpoint

Research viewpoint

  • December 1st, 2009

Soft fruit breeder Ralph Scorza and colleagues developed this pitless plum.

Continuing budget constraints at U.S. universities will result in fewer scientists and less research for growers to draw upon, predicts Larry Gut, entomologist at Michigan State University.

“People are being laid off and let go,” Gut said. “I’m afraid it [...]

  • Field sorting could bring a bonus

Field sorting could bring a bonus

  • December 1st, 2009

The recently planted WSU research orchard will allow study of planting designs for the future.

One of the new technologies Washington State University entomologist Dr. Jay Brunner expects and hopes to see in the next decade is automated sorting of fruit in the field. Apart from reducing a grower’s costs [...]

  • Allow parasites to control leafhopper

Allow parasites to control leafhopper

  • December 1st, 2009

A decade ago, the western grape leafhopper was known to exist in British Columbia only on the east side of the Okanagan Valley, from Penticton south to the Canada-U.S. border. Today, reports of the pest are coming from the west side of the valley and north of Penticton, highlighting [...]

  • Cultivating beneficials

Cultivating beneficials

  • December 1st, 2009

Mike Omeg checks for beneficial insects in goldenrod plants in an insectary alongside a Regina cherry block. He’s watched by (from left) Drew Merritt and Kristin Currin of Humble Roots Farm & Nursery at Mosier, Oregon, and Gwendolyn Ellen of Oregon State

Oregon cherry grower Mike Omeg is worried about [...]

Cover crops and pest control

  • December 1st, 2009

Does attracting natural enemies to an orchard by planting a cover crop translate to better biological control of pests in the trees? Dr. David Horton, entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Yakima, Washington, hopes to find out.

Horton is conducting trials in a research orchard and three commercial [...]

  • Education eases growers into new era of pest control

Education eases growers into new era of pest control

  • September 1st, 2009

Dr. Jay Brunner (right) and the Pest Management Transition Project team have reached out to growers, consultants, and farmworkers.

by Keith R. Granger, Jay F. Brunner, and Nadine Lehrer, WSU Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center, Wenatchee, Washington

The Pest Management Transition Project, spearheaded by Dr. Jay Brunner at Washington State [...]

Good Stuff

  • August 1st, 2009

Tunnel tour
Haygrove Tunnels is organizing a tour to the United Kingdom to give U.S. growers an opportunity to see tunnels used on British farms. The tour, which is scheduled for September 27-30, will highlight cost-effective production methods, tunnel innovations, and research results.

The cost is $599 for double occupancy. [...]

  • Recruit owls to control gophers

Recruit owls to control gophers

  • August 1st, 2009

Cabinetmaker Tuck Contreras (right) discusses birdhouses with Dave Case, an orchardist in Chelan, Washington, while Mike Wacker of The Dalles, Oregon, inspects an owl box.

Orchardists in the Pacific Northwest are installing owl boxes in the hope that owls will help control gophers, but it can take time for the [...]