• Watch out, codling moth!

Watch out, codling moth!

  • May 1st, 2012

Left: A female Neoscona oaxacensis orb-weaving spider. Top: Cheiracanthium spiders are known as yellow sac spiders. They are usually pale colored and are 1/5 to 3/8 inch long. Gut-content analysis has shown evidence of feeding on codling moth. In central Washington, C. mildei is the species most commonly found. [...]

  • Organic viticulture is all about timing

Organic viticulture is all about timing

  • May 1st, 2012

Bill Powers used common materials—screen mesh, bottoms of plastic jugs—to construct his pest fan.
Melissa Hansen

The key to making organic practices effective in the vineyard boils down to timing, says organic wine grape pioneer Bill Powers. With more than two decades of organic farming experience, he’s used farmer know-how [...]

Who’s eating codling moth?

  • April 15th, 2012

This article is part of a series on the multistate project “Enhancing Biological Control in Western Orchards.”

How big a role can predators play in controlling codling moth in fruit orchards? That’s a question that Dr. Thomas Unruh, geneticist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Yakima, Washington, wants to [...]

  • Leafroller challenges cherry growers

Leafroller challenges cherry growers

  • April 1st, 2012

Obliquebanded leafroller larva
Ontario Ministry of Agriculture

Tart cherry growers need to use a modern, effective insecticide to control obliquebanded leafroller about two weeks before ­harvest—or risk delivering a contaminated crop that may be rejected by the processor.

That’s the advice of Dr. Nikki Rothwell, the entomologist who coordinates activities at [...]

Pests sneak into U.K.

  • April 1st, 2012

Two new pests—the brown marmorated stinkbug and spotted wing drosophila—have snuck into the United Kingdom but are not yet established there.

Two adult brown marmorated stinkbugs were intercepted at a U.K. airport in 2010 in passenger luggage on a flight from the United States, according to a report in the [...]

Stinkbug watch

  • April 1st, 2012

Entomologists in New York State developed a clever way of keeping an eye out for inroads by the brown marmorated stinkbug. It’s been found across the state. So far, however, numbers have stayed small, and, as far as is known, no fruit growers have needed to spray to suppress [...]

  • Organic control for flea weevil

Organic control for flea weevil

  • March 15th, 2012

Damage by apple flea weevil.
Matt Grieshop­­­

Organic apple growers in the Midwest appear to have a relatively simple solution to their problems with apple flea weevil, which appeared suddenly as a problem in Michigan two years ago and took out 90 percent of the fruit in some orchards.

The best [...]

  • New pest keeps industry guessing

New pest keeps industry guessing

  • March 1st, 2012

A female spotted wing drosophila is about to enter a Contech apple cider vinegar trap. WSU scientists will be trapping for the pest during the coming season and will send out e-mail alerts.
ELIZABETH BEERS, WSU

Will spotted wing drosophila became a threat to cherry production in Washington State, or [...]

How to conserve beneficials while fighting stinkbug

  • March 1st, 2012

Penn State University entomologist Dr. David Biddinger provided some rules of thumb growers can apply so as not to destroy all natural enemies and the integrity of integrated pest management programs as they go about controlling the brown marmorated stinkbug.

Insecticide selection—Choose the product least harmful to natural enemies, but [...]

  • Biocontrol is fragile

Biocontrol is fragile

  • March 1st, 2012

These four creatures have survived pesticide treatments to become the most important biocontrol agents in eastern apple orchards. There are two species of predatory mites (far left and far right pictures); the “mite destroyer” ladybeetle Stethorus punctum (center left); and the woolly apple aphid parasitic wasp, Aphelinus mali.

The arrival [...]

  • New pests threaten Washington grapes

New pests threaten Washington grapes

  • March 1st, 2012

Doug Walsh, holding a mealybug pheromone trap, says that such traps have been used throughout the state to look for vine mealybug. Thus far, the destructive pest that’s prevalent throughout California grape regions, has not been found in Washington.
Melissa Hansen

While exotic and invasive pests threaten grape industries in [...]

  • Trapping for grape mealybug

Trapping for grape mealybug

  • March 1st, 2012

Brian Bahder transfers a first-instar grape mealybug from a grapevine leafroll-diseased Concord vine to a healthy Concord vine to assess mealybug competency as a vector.
Melissa Hansen

With the insidious spread of grapevine leafroll disease in Washington State vineyards, Washington State University scientists have worked to help growers better detect [...]