Research tackles decay issue

A new project will focus on controlling decay and finding pollinizers that are not disease hosts.

ADVERTISEMENT

  • Calculating the value of biological control

Calculating the value of biological control

  • April 1st, 2013

Washington State University entomologist Dr. Stan Hoyt developed integrated mite control in the late 1960s (see “How integrated mite control works”).

Over the last four decades, integrated mite control has saved Washington fruit growers millions of dollars each year because they did not have to use specific miticides to control [...]

  • The Top 5: What growers can do to improve pollination success

The Top 5: What growers can do to improve pollination success

  • March 15th, 2013

Inspect the bees you receive. A strong hive should have enough adult bees to cover eight to ten frames.

Honeybees are under unprecedented pressure, besieged by ­parasitic mites, viruses, diseases, and pesticide residues.

So, what can orchardists do to assure they will have pollination success during the bloom period, this year [...]

  • Kill the pathogen

Kill the pathogen

  • March 15th, 2013

Apple scab is a serious problem in humid climates, and McIntosh is very susceptible. Lesions occur on both leaves and fruit.
PHOTO COURTESY OF GEORGE SUNDIN

Apple growers have three new fungicides they can use to control apple scab, and Dr. George Sundin would like to see growers keep them.

“Use [...]

  • Developing a disease management program

Developing a disease management program

  • March 15th, 2013

Washington State University viticulture extension specialist Dr. Michelle Moyer suggests growers consider the following when developing a ­disease management program:

•    Reproductive rate of the pathogen. How fast can the disease reproduce in your vineyard? Is weather conducive to reproduction?
•    Speed of your reaction time. Do you have enough [...]

  • Living with cherry diseases

Living with cherry diseases

  • March 15th, 2013

Little cherry disease made a dramatic resurgence in Washington in 2010 and has since spread rapidly. These Sweetheart cherries show symptoms of small and puny fruit.
PHOTO BY KEN EASTWELL

With no cure for cherry trees infected with most viruses—short of cutting them out of the orchard—Washington State University researchers [...]

  • Deer Wars

Deer Wars

  • March 15th, 2013

Growers in the prime fruit-growing area surrounding Grand Traverse Bay in northwest Michigan are protesting the conversion of their orchards into prime hunting ground for deer hunters wanting to shoot bucks with ­bigger antlers.

The state’s Department of Natural Resources approved a hunter-requested program called the Quality Deer Management Program [...]

Preventing mildew

  • March 15th, 2013

Guide for grape pest management available
Washington State University’s 2013 Grape Pest Management Guide includes recommendations for controlling insects, weeds, diseases, and other pests. The guide also includes results of 2012 fungicide efficacy trials, a table with Fungicide Resistance Action Committee (FRAC) codes for resistance management, and suggestions of [...]

  • Working with copper

Working with copper

  • March 15th, 2013

Copper is a potent spray chemical, useful on many stone and pome fruits. It is active against bacterial diseases like fireblight, bacterial canker, and bacterial spot, and fungal diseases like cherry leaf spot, peach leaf curl, and apple scab as well.

Used correctly, copper sprays, especially very early in the [...]

  • Codling moth: It’s what’s for dinner.

Codling moth: It’s what’s for dinner.

  • March 15th, 2013

A sterilized carabid beetle before gut dissection.
Angela Gadino, WSU

Do you ever wonder what those earwigs, spiders, and other ground-dwelling predators eat in your orchard?

This question has been a main focus in the Enhancing Biological Control in Western Orchards Specialty Crop Research Initiative project. We know these predators are [...]

Last Bite: Do you know your pests?

  • March 1st, 2013

1    In which plant has the brown marmorated stinkbug been most commonly found in Oregon?
a.    Tree of heaven
b.    Hop
c.    Cherry
d.    Holly
e.    Grape

2    Which of the following features cannot be used to distinguish spotted wing drosophila from the common fruit fly?
a.    Dark bands on [...]

Bug pheromone studied

  • March 1st, 2013

In tree fruit pest management, most monitoring and mating disruption technologies are based on phero­mones that female insects release to attract males. For example, sex pheromones are used to lure male codling moths to traps or in order to mimic females and confuse the males to reduce their chances [...]

  • Bacterial canker

Bacterial canker

  • March 1st, 2013

The weather turned hot and dry—­conditions conducive to healing the cuts without making the canker situation worse. Then, the recommended approach was to make two fall sprays of copper, with two more copper sprays recommended before bud break this spring.
12 STEPS TO MANAGE BACTERIAL CANKER
In Oregon, bacterial [...]