Brown rot surprises cherry growers

Tart cherry growers need to watch out for European brown rot as bloom arrives.

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  • Fireblight, antibiotics, and the NOSB

Fireblight, antibiotics, and the NOSB

  • February 15th, 2013

Antibiotics have long been key disease control materials for fireblight, one of the few uses of antibiotics in plant agriculture. These materials are natural compounds produced by naturally occurring soil microorganisms. For the past several decades, the most common control for fireblight has been the use of antibiotic sprays [...]

  • Fireblight is native to North America

Fireblight is native to North America

  • February 15th, 2013

Fireblight is a plant disease of apples and pears caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora. It is native to North America where it resides in wild hosts such as crab apple and hawthorn. Over the decades, it has spread to other pome fruit producing regions in Europe, the Middle [...]

  • Enhancing biocontrol

Enhancing biocontrol

  • February 1st, 2013

Knowing when and where natural enemies, such as the green lacewing, are active is critical in order to conserve them. Large inset: Garden orb web spider in apple orchard. Small inset: Adult ladybug feeding on aphids.

This is the first article in an eight-part series highlighting results of a five-year [...]

  • Last Bite

Last Bite

  • January 15th, 2013

1.    Which of the following is not a tree fruit disease?
a.    Black rot
b.    Blue mold
c.    White rot
d.    Pink rot
e.    Coral rot
f.    Gray mold
2.    Which of the following is not a fungicide?
a.    Topguard
b.    Centaur
c.    Nordox
d.    Regalia
3. [...]

  • Eradication not likely

Eradication not likely

  • December 1st, 2012

The light brown apple moth is about a quarter of an inch long.
PHOTO BY R. ANSON EAGLIN, USDA APHIS

State and federal officials, and growers and homeowners, in California have settled in for a long, contentious battle with light brown apple moth, an invasive leaf-rolling insect found there since [...]

  • Sterile insects get a boost

Sterile insects get a boost

  • November 1st, 2012

In 1959, the very nasty flesh-invading screwworm fly was eradicated from Florida using a new kind of technology called SIT—Sterile Insect Technique.

Since then, the technology has been widely used. It is effective against fruit flies. It’s also being tested against malaria-carrying mosquitoes and against tsetse flies that cause sleeping [...]

  • Research project tackles trunk diseases

Research project tackles trunk diseases

  • November 1st, 2012

Researchers will use nearly $1.8 million in grant money to develop new detection, extension, and research tools for managing wood-canker diseases of grapes and nut crops. Wood-canker diseases are a leading cause of vineyard and orchard removal in many parts of the country.

The research project was one of 14 [...]

  • Yeast tested as lure

Yeast tested as lure

  • November 1st, 2012

A species of yeast that University of California scientists have found in cherries and raspberries infested by the spotted wing drosophila could play a role in developing better lures to detect the pest.
The spotted wing drosophila, a pest that originated in Asia, first invaded ­California in 2008. If [...]

B.C.’s Sterile Insect Release program evolves

  • November 1st, 2012

In sterile insect release, male insects made sterile by exposure to gamma radiation are released in huge numbers to compete with normal wild males. When the sterile males win the mating game, females lay infertile eggs.

In mating disruption, female sex hormones are released in such volume that males can’t [...]

  • Seaweeds tested for pest control

Seaweeds tested for pest control

  • November 1st, 2012

Seaweed extracts are typically used by growers with the aim of improving tree growth and enhancing fruit yields and quality. Although the extracts are regulated and marketed as plant growth regulators, entomologists have been studying whether the products could also have benefits in terms of pest control.

Results of a [...]

  • Good to Know

Good to Know

Grape growers have been closely watching the spread of the brown marmorated stinkbug (Halyomorpha halys Stål). It was first identified in 1996 in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and has spread to 36 states. In 2010, a warm winter and spring caused an early population surge of BMSB that caught fruit and [...]

  • Parasite studied in quarantine

Parasite studied in quarantine

  • October 1st, 2012

Scientists around the United States are studying a natural enemy of the brown marmorated stinkbug that has been imported from China with the hope that it might help keep the pest in check in this country.

The parasitic wasp Trissolcus halyomorphae was collected in the fall of 2011 by U.S. [...]