Research tackles decay issue

A new project will focus on controlling decay and finding pollinizers that are not disease hosts.

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New fungicides benefit from lessons of Benlate

  • February 15th, 2012

Fruit growers will have new fungicides this year to help manage diseases as diverse as leaf spot in cherries, scab in apples, and brown rot and scab on peaches.      The new materials are so-called second-­generation succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors (SDHI), similar in action to boscalid, one [...]

Let natural enemies play a role

  • February 1st, 2012

Growers today tend to think that integrated pest management has to do primarily with monitoring pests and scheduling ­pesticide applications.

But that’s not what IPM was envisioned to be at the outset, Dr. Nick Mills, entomologist with the University of California, Berkeley, told growers during the Washington State Horticultural Association’s [...]

Spraying with sprinklers

  • December 1st, 2011

On a cold rainy day with apple scab threatening, wouldn’t it be nice to push a button labeled “Fungicide” and let the orchard spray itself?

Spraying is one of those things all orchardists have to do. Whether conventional or organic, they spend a lot of time filling sprayers, mixing chemicals, [...]

  • Pest help at your fingertips

Pest help at your fingertips

  • December 1st, 2011

Andy Kahn can use his iPhone to access WSU’s Decision Aid System, which automatically uploads weather data from the AgWeatherNet and provides pest predictions and control recommendations.

Washington State University’s online Decision Aid System has made life easier for integrated pest management consultant Andy Kahn of Wenatchee. He can log [...]

  • Grape industry goes after viruses

Grape industry goes after viruses

  • December 1st, 2011

Grapevine leafroll disease is easy to diagnose in red varieties, like this Cabernet Sauvignon vine, but more difficult in white varieties where the only symptom might be downward curling of leaves.

The Washington grape industry has put a bull’s-eye on grape viruses and diseases and is going after its target [...]

  • $60-million boost

$60-million boost

  • December 1st, 2011

A mechanical harvester is part of a major research project relating to production and marketing of stem-free sweet cherries.

More than $60 million dollars in grants have been awarded so far through the Specialty Crop Research Initiative specifically for research ­projects in tree fruit and grapes.

This is the fourth year [...]

Good Stuff

  • December 1st, 2011

Ty Snyder promoted
C & O Nursery of Wenatchee, Washington, has promoted Ty Snyder to the position of orchard manager. Snyder has worked at the nursery since 2006 and earned an associate degree in agriculture from Wenatchee Valley College. He is managing the company’s Rocky Reach and Grant Road [...]

  • Mildew resistance quest continues

Mildew resistance quest continues

  • December 1st, 2011

Next year, Nnadozie Oraguzie will begin field testing a new generation of mildew-resistant sweet cherry selections as he works to combine disease resistance with high fruit quality traits.
Courtesy of Washington State University

While there is keen grower interest in development of cherry varieties resistant to powdery mildew, the resulting [...]

  • Research station has organic orchard

Research station has organic orchard

  • December 1st, 2011

Joe Nicholson of New York with a Rubinola tree that shows symptoms of sulfur intolerance.
Geraldine Warner

Britain has only about a dozen serious ­commercial organic growers, estimates Dr. Jerry Cross, who heads the entomology and plant pathology team at East Malling Research.

And East Malling Research is one of them.

The [...]

  • Spray equipment still evolving

Spray equipment still evolving

  • December 1st, 2011

The Raven spray controller has brought major improvements to orchard spraying.
Courtesy Blueline Equipment

A major breakthrough in orchard spray technology in the last decade has been a rate control system that automatically calibrates sprayers during spraying, saving countless gallons of crop protection chemicals. Future spray technologies could include sprayers [...]

  • Precise IPM requires good data

Precise IPM requires good data

  • December 1st, 2011

This Washington State University weather station in Tonasket is part of the AgWeatherNet service, providing growers with detailed environmental data.
courtesy washington state university

More precise integrated pest management practices go hand in hand with accurate weather and environmental data. You can’t have better targeted insect sprays or use predictive [...]

Focusing on tomorrow today

  • December 1st, 2011

Apple, pear, and walnut growers will have several opportunities this winter to learn how to take advantage of natural enemies in their orchards for controlling key pests.

Washington State University entomologist Dr. Vince Jones expects to see a move towards more precise integrated pest management in apples and pears in [...]