Brown rot surprises cherry growers

Tart cherry growers need to watch out for European brown rot as bloom arrives.

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  • How to manage scab and mildew

How to manage scab and mildew

  • April 1st, 2011

Powdery mildew appears as superficial, white powdery growth on leaves and shoots that results in the stunting and distortion of young growth. Right: ruit like this Jonathan apple, when infected with powdery mildew, are stunted and russetted, and fruit set may be reduced.
BRITISH COLUMBIA MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE

A good [...]

ARM studied in cherries

  • April 1st, 2011

In the cherry orchards of northwest Michigan around Traverse City, growers use a mixture of methods to control their archenemies: cherry fruit fly, plum curculio, and cherry leaf spot.

Some growers use airblast sprayers while others use air-curtain sprayers. Some run their sprayers down the middle of every tree row [...]

  • Does ARM still work in modern orchards?

Does ARM still work in modern orchards?

  • April 1st, 2011

Penn State entomologist Dr. Larry Hull has spent much of his 35-plus-year career perfecting and advocating a technique called alternate row middle (ARM) spraying for insect control. The technique started in New York, came to Pennsylvania in the 1960s, and quickly caught on and became widely used by growers [...]

Good Stuff

  • March 15th, 2011

Sweet success
A new series of scab-resistant apples called “Sweet Resistants” developed by the Consorzio Italiano Vivaisti (CIV) in Italy was among the ten finalists for the Fruit Logistica Innovation Award during the Fruit Logistica trade fair in February. The five varieties in the series are Gaia, Gemini, Renoir, [...]

  • Beekeepers fear loss of forage

Beekeepers fear loss of forage

  • March 15th, 2011

The purple spotted knapweed flower is attractive to bees and a good nectar producer: However, once it gains a foothold, spotted knapweed kills competing vegetation and creates conditions for its own spread.
Photo by James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org photo Inset by Marisa Williams, University of Arkansas, [...]

  • Watch out for the good guys

Watch out for the good guys

  • March 15th, 2011

Researchers have been testing different types and colors of traps for monitoring beneficial insects. This white sticky trap, placed next to an insect attractant, caught many lacewings.
Photo by Geraldine Warner

New monitoring tools are providing a window into the biological control taking place in orchards, and it looks like [...]

  • Drosophila parasitoid found

Drosophila parasitoid found

  • March 15th, 2011

A female wasp attacks a spotted wing drosophila pupa
PhotoS COURTESY OF PETER SHEARER AND PRESTON BROWN, OSU

Scientists at Oregon State University have identified a parasitoid of the spotted wing drosophila, raising hopes that in the future this natural enemy might help control the pest.

It’s a small wasp from [...]

  • A primer on Botrytis cinerea

A primer on Botrytis cinerea

  • March 1st, 2011

Dr. Wayne Wilcox of Cornell University says Botrytis cinerea as a weak pathogen that prefers injured, senescent tissue, such as old blossom parts and ripening fruit. The more ripe the fruit, the more susceptible it becomes, an added consideration when rains delay harvest.

Botrytis thrives where there’s low evaporative water [...]

  • Bunch rot strategy for 2011

Bunch rot strategy for 2011

  • March 1st, 2011

PHOTO COURTESY OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY

For Washington grape growers who had a bunch rot problem in 2010, efforts to get rid of any carryover crop are worthwhile, says a New York plant pathologist. Growers should also be prepared to spray a botrytis-specific fungicide during bloom, if weather conditions are favorable [...]

  • Botrytis comes to dry Washington

Botrytis comes to dry Washington

  • March 1st, 2011

Latent infections inside a cluster can take over the bunch by harvest time.
PHOTO COURTESY OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY

Last year’s cool season not only challenged growers and winemakers with slow fruit ripening, it also brought bunch rot to some vineyards, causing significant damage from a lack of disease awareness.

The 2010 [...]

  • Will the new pest go after grapes?

Will the new pest go after grapes?

  • March 1st, 2011

Grape growers learn to identify spotted wing drosophila at a Washington State Grape Society meeting.
Photo by Melissa Hansen

Preliminary tests conducted last fall indicate that Washington State grapes might not be attractive to the spotted wing drosophila, an invasive new pest that has popped up across much of U.S. [...]

  • Cougarblight model updated

Cougarblight model updated

  • March 1st, 2011

Washington State University is working to help growers be better prepared to fight fireblight.

Washington State University’s Cougarblight model is being updated to improve its ability to predict when conditions are conducive to fireblight.

The model uses information on temperature, wetness, and presence of fireblight bacteria to predict infections and was [...]