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Good Stuff

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Sweet success
A new series of scab-resistant apples called “Sweet Resistants” developed by the Consorzio Italiano Vivaisti (CIV) in Italy was among the ten finalists for the Fruit Logistica Innovation Award during the Fruit Logistica trade

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Watch out for the good guys

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Researchers have been testing different types and colors of traps for monitoring beneficial insects. This white sticky trap, placed next to an insect attractant, caught many lacewings.
Photo by Geraldine Warner

New monitoring tools are providing a

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Researchers tackle apple weevil

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Small and black, the apple flea weevil looks a bit like its larger snout beetle relative, the plum curculio.
Photo by matt grieshop, michigan state university

A coalition of partners in four Midwestern states has applied for

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Rainfastness of pesticides varies

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John Wise carries out his rainfastness work on grapes and apples at Michigan State University’s Trevor Nichols Research Complex, where he is coordinator of research.

Folklore says that after a heavy rainfall, you might as well

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Buffers would make orchards vulnerable

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If no-spray buffers proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency go into effect, orchardists will be unable to use critical pesticides on a large proportion of their acreage, including products that will be necessary to

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Stinkbugs on the move

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Adult brown marmorated stinkbugs feed on ripe peaches, a preferred fruit.

A monitoring trap in a commercial apple orchard drew large numbers of bugs. Some traps attracted 2,000 bugs.

The brown marmorated stinkbug, Halyomorpha halys, is rapidly

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Defense strategies

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Brown marmorated stinkbug nymphs develop through five instars, all feeding on fruit. Nymphs and adults cause both external and internal injury.
Photo by Tracy Leskey

One of the easier ways of monitoring the brown marmorated stinkbug’s invasion

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Grower battles bug

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PHOTO BY TRACY LESKEY

Gerrardstown, West Virginia, apple grower George Behling is one very concerned grower. He first saw this stinkbug two years ago, but didn’t distinguish it at first from ordinary stinkbugs, which have been

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Ready for drosophila

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Spotted wing drosophila larvae that hatch from eggs inside the fruit sometimes pop out and walk around on the surface. The spotted wing drosophila can pupate inside the cherry, outside the cherry, or halfway out.
PHOTOS

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A primer on Botrytis cinerea

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Dr. Wayne Wilcox of Cornell University says Botrytis cinerea as a weak pathogen that prefers injured, senescent tissue, such as old blossom parts and ripening fruit. The more ripe the fruit, the more susceptible it

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Bunch rot strategy for 2011

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PHOTO COURTESY OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY

For Washington grape growers who had a bunch rot problem in 2010, efforts to get rid of any carryover crop are worthwhile, says a New York plant pathologist. Growers should also

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Botrytis comes to dry Washington

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Latent infections inside a cluster can take over the bunch by harvest time.
PHOTO COURTESY OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY

Last year’s cool season not only challenged growers and winemakers with slow fruit ripening, it also brought bunch rot

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Will the new pest go after grapes?

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Grape growers learn to identify spotted wing drosophila at a Washington State Grape Society meeting.
Photo by Melissa Hansen

Preliminary tests conducted last fall indicate that Washington State grapes might not be attractive to the spotted wing

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Cougarblight model updated

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Washington State University is working to help growers be better prepared to fight fireblight.

Washington State University’s Cougarblight model is being updated to improve its ability to predict when conditions are conducive to fireblight.

The model uses

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Sap beetles attacked Michigan cherries

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The strawberry sap beetle was one of three species identified in cherry orchards. The other two were dusky and picnic sap beetles.
Photo by Stephen Luk

Cherry growers around Traverse City, Michigan, were plagued last season by

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Obliquebanded leafroller bugs tart cherry growers

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Leafroller larvae form webs and use them to curl leaves into protective structures.
Photo Courtesy Of Washington State University

Obliquebanded leafroller has been increasing as a problem in tart cherries in recent years, where the black-headed green

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Opportunistic fungi

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Disease organisms invade injured tissue and develop cankers that release spores. Some red strains of McIntosh are susceptible, for reasons unknown, to opportunistic diseases that kill branches.
Photos courtesy of george sundin, Michigan State University

Starting in

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Watch for crown gall and vine decline

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Vineyardists in the Pacific Northwest have been relatively lucky regarding the number of grape diseases they have to worry about. But recent experiences indicate that Washington growers should also watch for diseases associated with vine

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BUYER BEWARE: Certified may not be clean

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Recent Washington State grower experiences of finding disease in a vineyard planted with certified stock have highlighted the weaknesses of state plant health certification programs and the need for program improvement.

“We thought we had something

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A program for scab control

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Photos courtesy of kerik cox, cornell university

Growers producing apples in the cool, damp northeast quadrant of the United States need to take a step-by-careful-step approach to apple scab control—starting early and being meticulous—or they can

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Little cherries, little flavor

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The cool weather of 2010 highlighted a growing concern about little cherries showing up in some orchards. Follow-up testing by Washington State University confirmed that the trees were infected with a dreaded cherry disease that

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Tackling scab resistance

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Apple growers in the Midwest who stuck by the “old ways” of applying fungicides have not faced the problem of apple scab becoming resistant to fungicides. The old ways employed protectant fungicides like captan and

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Scab-resistant varieties need protection, too

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When apple breeders in New Jersey, Indiana, and Illinois came together in 1926 to form the Purdue-Rutgers-Illinois university collaboration called PRI, their ­number-one goal was to create new apple varieties that were scab resistant.

They did

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Spin your weeds away

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After years of sitting on a tractor to knock down vineyard weeds with an old grape hoe, only doing about an acre an hour and always causing some vine damage, Dave Kohler finally reached his

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Good Stuff

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With Come Unglued, there is no need to replace expensive PVC fittings.

Quick PVC pipe fix
Come Unglued is a new tool designed to save time and money when repairing PVC pipes. The tool uses heat to

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Rootstock effects on wine are minor

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Despite the discovery near Kennewick in 1894 of the destructive grapevine root pest phylloxera, the vast majority of Washington State’s vineyards continue to be planted to wine and juice grapes grown on their own roots.

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Breaking the weed cycle

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Wapato, Washington, grape grower Mike Sauer has experience with replanting both wine and juice grapes. Wine grapes, when following wine grapes in a vineyard with wide spacing between vine rows, are relatively easy, but Concords

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Clean plant material fundamental

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The young vines in grow tubes are replants due to disease-contaminated plant material.

When Tedd Wildman began planting lesser-known red wine grape varieties on Washington State’s Wahluke Slope ten years ago, he was careful to source

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Small orchards, but big impact

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South Tyrol extension advisor Bernhard Botzner shows the concrete poles used for trellis supports.

Published January 15, 2011
Don’t let the small size fool you. Individual apple orchards near Merano, in Italy’s Vinschgau Valley, may only be

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Italian extension service is well funded

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Published January 15, 2011
The South Tyrol Advisory Service performs many of the same services that Cooperative Extension does in the United States—educating growers about integrated pest management, irrigation, fertility, and nutrition. The biggest difference is

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Electric vehicle has power

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Karen Lewis and Gwen Hoheisel (standing) demonstrate how an electric utility vehicle can be used for herbicide spraying with the WeedSeeker technology.

Karen Lewis and Gwen Hoheisel, Washington State University Extension educators, say an electric all-terrain

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Tree IVs?

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This injector was tested with apple trees.

Might the airblast sprayer in the future be replaced by IV tubes jabbed in fruit trees?

Michigan State University entomologist Dr. John Wise decided to see if he could control

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Low-volume prestorage drenching is attractive

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Dave Rosenberger described how he tested the effectiveness of low-volume nonrecycling drenches for fruit going into storage. His audience included New York fruit growers and International Fruit Tree Association members on tour during the fruit

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Mysterious ailment strikes

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A mysterious disease that has been killing the best looking, reddest strains of McIntosh apples in the nicest orchards in the northwest quadrant of Michigan has tentatively been identified, and growers now have some idea

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Is drosophila a Washington State resident?

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Entomologists in the Pacific Northwest intend to find out how well the spotted wing drosophila can survive the region’s cold winters.

The pest, a native of Asia, was first seen in ­California in 2008. It was

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Use glyphosate with caution

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This stunted apple tree, which has a large basal canker, is in an orchard where the grower used glyphosate alone three to four times a year to control weeds. Cuts on the margin of the

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Symptoms of glyphosate damage

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Young trees can show injury after glyphosate application the previous year. One symptom of glyphosate damage is small spindly leaves that look like zinc deficiency. Shoot tips die so you get clustered growth.

Micronutrient (and often

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Managing new pests

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Pacific Northwest growers are vigilant following reports of spotted wing drosophila among Concord grapes in eastern Washington and the early appearance of the flies in traps in British Columbia’s Okanagan Valley in Canada.

While the susceptibility

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Antibiotic on organic sunset list

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Organic tree fruit growers in the Pacific Northwest are concerned that the National Organic Standards Board might drop its approval of the antibiotic Mycoshield (oxytetracycline or tetracycline) for organic production in 2012. The product is

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NW questions cherry fruit fly quarantine

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The western cherry fruit fly has not been found in California’s cherry-growing districts.

State officials in Oregon and Washington say ­California’s quarantine requirements for the Western cherry fruit fly are unjustified.

Helmuth Rogg, supervisor of the Oregon

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Quarantine alternative

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Dr. Wee Yee, entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Yakima, Washington, is conducting research to assess the likelihood of cherry fruit fly becoming established in certain overseas markets that are concerned about potential

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Moth poses little risk in Taiwan

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Dr. Lisa Neven is studying the survival of codling moth larvae in tropical conditions.

There is little risk of codling moth larvae shipped in apples to Taiwan resulting in the pest becoming established in that country,

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Classified Ads

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Stop bird damage. The American kestrel falcon is now looking

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Preventing pear rot

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Dr. David Sugar, plant pathologist at Oregon State University, says the nitrogen and calcium levels in the orchard can affect the potential for decay in pears after harvest.

Orchard management can play an important role in

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Protect trees from weeds and pests

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Control weeds while they’re small and easy to kill, so they don’t compete with the young trees.

In a new orchard, weeds have every condition they need to thrive and compete with the trees—full sun, regular

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Wasps ruin cherry crop

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The European paper wasp looks similar to a yellow jacket, but has a narrower body and longer hind legs.

Cherry growers in British Columbia, Canada, are battling a pest that last year forced several of them

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Meeting the organic challenge

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Harry and Jackie Hoch (center) gather in their orchard for a family photo on Easter weekend, where unusual 80-degree weather advanced the season, requiring sprays for disease control on the apricots and plums. With them

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Woolly apple aphid

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Syrphid fly larvae attack woolly apple aphids.

The woolly apple aphid overwinters as a nymph on the roots of apple trees, but can also overwinter on the aboveground part of the tree in protected areas on

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Solving the woolly apple aphid

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Washington Fruit and Produce Company planted alyssum between the rows of this new orchard to attract syrphid flies, which are good predators of woolly apple aphid.

Dain Craver’s plan to produce potted apple trees to sell

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