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The Next Decade

Featured stories about the next decade appear in this issue.

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Ready for change

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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As the new president, John Verbrugge will lead Washington’s Horticultural Association into more involvement with state regulatory issues.

New Hort President John Verbrugge represents a change

Cover crops and pest control

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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Does attracting natural enemies to an orchard by planting a cover crop translate to better biological control of pests in the trees? Dr. David Horton,

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Blast from the past

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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Robots harvesting fruit, scientists creating the perfect apple trees in petri dishes, and a fruit industry run by conglomerates were just some of the changes

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Growers foresee change

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There are too many new apple varieties, says Polish orchardist Krzysztof Hermanowicz.

New market niches, more emphasis on eating quality, technological advances in the orchard, more

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Growing nitrogen on the side

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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Dr. Steve Fransen points out that the ladino clover had pink root nodules, indicating that it was fixing nitrogen.

As commercial nitrogen fertilizers become more expensive,

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Wind of change

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“Change is in the wind,” an article in the Good Fruit Grower declared in 1987, which was a year of milestones for the Washington tree

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Sorting technology

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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Tree fruit packers believe that future technology will improve labor efficiencies while improving fruit quality

New technology will touch all areas of tree fruit production in

Cherry Institute looks to the future

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As the Pacific Northwest sweet cherry industry moves toward larger crops in the future, it will take the industry working together to achieve success, says

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Exotic varieties, new regions

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A new interest in clones and lesser-known varieties will drive vineyard plantings in Washington State in the next ten years, say industry experts.

Limited retail shelf

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Embracing change

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Laura Mrachek works to make a difference in the tree fruit industry.

Laura Mrachek, retiring president of the Washington State Horticultural Association, likes change.

So, when she

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Nursery perspective

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These finished nursery trees will soon be harvested and prepared for later planting by growers.

With the proliferation of new tree fruit varieties released in the

Field sorting culls

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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One area of research that John Verbrugge thinks has been overlooked is field sorting of culls.

Verbrugge, new president of the Washington State Horticultural Association, said

Video touts fruit industry jobs

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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Jobs in the tree fruit industry aren’t limited to the obvious ones of picking or packing fruit. That’s the message conveyed in a new video

How many is too many?

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When it comes to new varieties, John Rice predicts that in the next decade, most retailers will offer five main apple varieties year round—Gala, Fuji,

GRAS2P: Not another audit program

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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Susan Pheasant

Tesco Nature’s Choice, British Retail Consortium, Safe Quality Food 1000 and 2000, U.S. Department of Agriculture GAP, Costco, Food Alliance, GlobalGAP, Primus, Protected Harvest

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Should WAC come back?

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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A rack card developed by CMI tells consumers about the health benefits of eating apples, with a focus on fiber content.

If the Washington apple industry

Audit harmony

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A group of around 50 produce industry leaders are working on an effort to harmonize the various food-safety standards and audits that exist today and

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Produce expert

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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With an office in Yakima, Washington, Wal-Mart plans to keep prices lower and buy directly from growers, cutting out the middleman, says a former Wal-Mart

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Last Bite – The Land of the Yakamas

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Cowin paid careful attention to marketing, and his high-quality fruit stood out in the marketplace.

In 1909-1910, Earle Cowin earned the distinction of being one of

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Market limitations

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How new varieties will coexist with those that have already carved out shelf space is the million-dollar question.

The biggest change from a marketer’s standpoint in

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Allow parasites to control leafhopper

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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A decade ago, the western grape leafhopper was known to exist in British Columbia only on the east side of the Okanagan Valley, from Penticton

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Extension educators

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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WSU Extension educator Karen Lewis expects to see more technologies used in orchards to augment workers, in addition to platforms.

In the future, growers won’t need

Good Point – Jim McFerson

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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Predictions and promises are easy enough, as long as they’re vague. On the other hand, few people really remember the predictions, so why not take

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Research viewpoint

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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Soft fruit breeder Ralph Scorza and colleagues developed this pitless plum.

Continuing budget constraints at U.S. universities will result in fewer scientists and less research for

Cold-friendly varieties

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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Last winter’s cold damage has helped researchers and grape growers identify varieties that are best suited to British Columbia’s Okanagan Valley.

Working with a handful of

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Field sorting could bring a bonus

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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The recently planted WSU research orchard will allow study of planting designs for the future.

One of the new technologies Washington State University entomologist Dr. Jay

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Surviving the cold

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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These grapevines await their winter pruning. Mechanically pruning vines that have severe bud damage from cold may be a cost-effective option, says Vincor’s Frank Hellwig.

Reports

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Past, present, and future

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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Chuck Peters designed his new pear orchard with mechanization and new technologies in mind.

It might be possible to develop apples with yet-to-be-identified health benefits, says

Australia’s water crisis forces changes

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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Dealing with rising temperatures may be a conundrum for fruit growers confronting ­climate change, but in Australia it’s been ­complicated by widespread drought since 2003.

Two

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Changes will come faster. Will you keep up?

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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Agricultural economist

Two decades ago, at a time when the industry had yet to produce more than 60 million boxes of apples and Red Delicious made

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Invite the whole community

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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Mason bee nests in the orchard of Robert Schreiber at Poysdorf, Austria, pictured during an International Fruit Tree Association tour

Growers should think not about species

Apple marketing incentive

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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“If an apple were to explode like a hand grenade when it reached a stage of ripeness not permitting it to reach the consumer in

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Cultivating beneficials

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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Mike Omeg checks for beneficial insects in goldenrod plants in an insectary alongside a Regina cherry block. He’s watched by (from left) Drew Merritt and

Identity crisis

December 1st, 2009|0 Comments

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The flood of new apple varieties will continue until the consumer is so confused about the Washington apple identity that they might turn to something