Project Description

Sustainable & Organic Agriculture

Featured stories covering sustainable and organic agriculture appear in this issue.

  • Help needed for invasive stinkbug

Help needed for invasive stinkbug

  • May 1st, 2011

Brown marmorated stinkbugs overwinter in protected areas, emerge in April in the mid-Atlantic area, and lay eggs from May through August.

Entomologists in the mid-Atlantic [...]

  • Effective, economical weed control

Effective, economical weed control

  • May 1st, 2011

The Wonder Weeder and similar tools deliver orchard weed control at less cost than chemical controls.

The Holy Grail that organic apple growers are looking [...]

  • Late grafting can be successful

Late grafting can be successful

  • May 1st, 2011

Imperial Gala on Tatura Trellis were bark grafted in early October (spring) 2009. A severe wind and rainstorm in the summer damaged many grafts [...]

  • Old Southern apples star in book

Old Southern apples star in book

  • May 1st, 2011

Disharoon, an old, north Georgia apple thought to have been cultivated by native Americans, came to Lee Calhoun’s orchard in 1998.

The apples in Lee [...]

  • Attracting beneficial insects

Attracting beneficial insects

  • May 1st, 2011

A sticky trap monitors beneficial insect abundance near flowering yarrow plants. After evaluating more than 40 flowering perennial plant species, [...]

  • Honeycrisp challenges club concept

Honeycrisp challenges club concept

  • May 1st, 2011

The name Ambrosia reflects the aromatic flavor of the apple.
Courtesy Sally & Wilfrid Mennell

Honeycrisp has set the standard for new varieties to follow [...]

  • Measuring the organic footprint

Measuring the organic footprint

  • May 1st, 2011

Tilling the soil releases carbon into the atmosphere, but does the compost that organic growers apply compensate for that?

Emissions of nitrous oxide from on-farm [...]

  • Beauty with benefits

Beauty with benefits

  • May 1st, 2011

David James

Restoring native sagebrush steppe habitat in and near vineyards and wineries in central Washington could attract more than just beneficial insects to the [...]

  • Fruit processor harnesses solar power

Fruit processor harnesses solar power

  • May 1st, 2011

This 19-acre solar power system at Knouse Foods will generate 4 million kilowatt-hours of electricity each year. The 14,000 230-watt polycrystalline solar panels face [...]

  • What growers have learned

What growers have learned

  • May 1st, 2011

Bull suckers are already becoming obvious in this block of cherries on the Upright Fruiting Offshoots system that was planted a year ago at [...]

  • Cutting costs of IPM

Cutting costs of IPM

  • May 1st, 2011

Vince Jones at Washington State University is testing the new Z-Trap, which zaps insects and records when they were trapped. It might be possible [...]

  • The art of tart

The art of tart

  • May 1st, 2011

Six MBA students say a single-strength tart cherry juice produced and marketed by a grower cooperative could be a marketplace winner.

What the tart cherry [...]

Knouse has wide reach

  • May 1st, 2011

Knouse Foods is a large fruit-processing company with seven processing plants in three states and 1,500 employees packing apple sauce, apple juice, apple slices, [...]

  • Growers gain UFO experience

Growers gain UFO experience

  • May 1st, 2011

Workers at Orchard View Farms tie cherry trees to the wire for training to the new Upright Fruiting Offshoots system.

Growers working with the new [...]

  • How big is the orchard footprint?

How big is the orchard footprint?

  • May 1st, 2011

The galvanized wire used for trellises might contribute significantly to the environmental footprint of an orchard because of the large amount of energy used [...]