• Opportunistic fungi

Opportunistic fungi

  • February 15th, 2011

Disease organisms invade injured tissue and develop cankers that release spores. Some red strains of McIntosh are susceptible, for reasons unknown, to opportunistic diseases that kill branches.
Photos courtesy of george sundin, Michigan State University

Starting in 2006, an epidemic of sorts started in apple orchards in Michigan. It was [...]

Marketers line up exclusive apples

  • February 1st, 2011

Aurora
Auvil Fruit Company
For a long time, Auvil Fruit Company had been on the lookout for a yellow, good-tasting dessert apple to add to its lineup of varieties, which includes Gala, Fuji, Honeycrisp, and Cripps Pink, but not a single Red or Golden Delicious apple.

Then along came Aurora, [...]

  • Organic bubble hasn’t burst

Organic bubble hasn’t burst

  • February 1st, 2011

The entry of Walmart into organic fruit retailing five years ago helped fuel the demand for organic fruit, and demand is still growing despite the economic recession, according to David Granatstein, Washington State University’s organic tree fruit specialist. Acreage of organic pears and cherries in Washington State dropped between [...]

Rootstocks, varieties, and tree training

  • February 1st, 2011

A research and demonstration orchard near Ferrara, Italy, is a horticulturist’s dream—a 25-acre plot to study rootstocks, varieties, and training systems for pears, apples, and cherries that’s funded by a private foundation without worry of budget cutbacks. And, how about a $3.5-million donation just for pears for the next [...]

  • New varieties are slow to be planted

New varieties are slow to be planted

  • February 1st, 2011

Laimburg Research Center’s Daniele Bona, left, shows the differences between high and low elevation in their variety trials.

Golden Delicious is the major variety grown in the South Tyrol, but a slow shift to newer varieties and improved clones of traditional ones is taking hold. In the last four years, [...]

  • Double-axis system shows benefits

Double-axis system shows benefits

  • January 15th, 2011

North Americans in the foreground Sigifredo Corral, left, and Martin Leighton compare notes on the impressive wall of Pink Lady apples.

Published January 15, 2011
The biaxis or double branch tree, with its ease of training to a fruiting wall, is being studied throughout Italy in different tree fruit crops [...]

  • Staying profitable

Staying profitable

  • January 15th, 2011

Hillsides near Bolzano are planted to apples and wine grapes, utilizing every meter of land.

Published January 15, 2011

An international group of tree fruit industry members traveled to northern Italy last November to see how mechanization has been adopted in high-density tree fruit plantings. The group saw the latest technology [...]

  • Firm seeks approval for transgenic apple

Firm seeks approval for transgenic apple

  • January 15th, 2011

The Arctic Golden was developed with the fresh-cut market in mind.

Published January 15, 2011
Last April, Okanagan Specialty Fruits, Inc., sent a package containing hundreds of pages of data and documents to the United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health ­Inspection Service in Washington, D.C.

According to Neal [...]

  • Fruiting walls suit machinery

Fruiting walls suit machinery

  • January 15th, 2011

Fruiting walls of Fuji.

Published January 15, 2011
The Institute of Agriculture at San Michele All’Adige looks for ways that orchardists and vineyardists can farm more efficiently and reduce labor needs. Following an intensive thinning study by the institute, more than 40 mechanical thinners are now in operation in Italian [...]

  • Small orchards, but big impact

Small orchards, but big impact

  • January 15th, 2011

South Tyrol extension advisor Bernhard Botzner shows the concrete poles used for trellis supports.

Published January 15, 2011
Don’t let the small size fool you. Individual apple orchards near Merano, in Italy’s Vinschgau Valley, may only be a few acres in size, but the valley has trees planted wall to [...]

  • Why Italian orchards are so productive

Why Italian orchards are so productive

  • January 15th, 2011

Dr. Martin Thalheimer says the South Tyrol’s high productivity in apples is due to a combination of factors—uniform, high-density plantings, a strong extension service, and adoption of modern orchard management techniques.

Published January 15, 2011
The high apple yields in Italy’s South Tyrol region are a result of improved management [...]

Chinese apple production still rising

  • January 1st, 2011

More are sold fresh. More than half the world’s apples are produced in China, a place where exact numbers are hard to find.      During U.S. Apple Association’s marketing and crop outlook conference this summer, Michael Choi, president of Zhonglu America Corporation, said apple industry [...]