• Last Bite – Low-grade labels highly valued

Last Bite – Low-grade labels highly valued

  • June 1st, 2010

Labels of “cooker” grade or C grade apples were usually green, yellow, or white. Today, collectors will often pay more for these rarer labels.

The color of an apple box label generally determined the grade of the fruit. A blue label meant Extra Fancy, a red label meant the second [...]

  • The instant orchard

The instant orchard

  • June 1st, 2010

Dale Goldy explains how large branches are removed and upright branches tied down to prevent competition with the central leader. This Honeycrisp block was planted in 2008 using nursery trees.

Dale Goldy, horticulturist with Stemilt Growers, Inc., in Washington State, has the same objective as Auvil Fruit Company when establishing [...]

In the Box

  • June 1st, 2010

Starting new trees
Dear Good Fruit Grower:

Kudos to you and Tim Smith for helping growers get their trees started right. Regarding your article “Getting trees off to a good start,” in the May 1 issue of Good Fruit Grower, you are spot on with the recommendation “to apply just [...]

Wanted: Endangered apples

  • May 15th, 2010

Walking through the Maine Heritage Orchard in Unity, Maine, is like walking through a Noah’s Ark for apples. The orchard, maintained by the Maine Organic Farmers & Gardeners Association, is filled with endangered apple varieties grafted onto stock apple trees, sometimes up to ten varieties on a single tree. [...]

  • Maine apples wanted

Maine apples wanted

  • May 15th, 2010

John Bunker examines an apple at the Sandy River Orchard, Mercer, Maine, with 90-year-old Francis Fenton, owner (in blue).

These are some of the varieties John Bunker is seeking:

Briggs Auburn: Originated on the farm of Thomas Record of Minot (then part of Auburn). The fruit is large and yellow with [...]

  • You hear that buzz?

You hear that buzz?

  • May 15th, 2010

SweeTango orchards like this one at Pepin Heights produced enough fruit last year to start the buzz, which could rise to a crescendo this August if a good crop and the marketing plan come together as planned.

SweeTango apples will, nature cooperating, begin flowing to market in commercial quantities in [...]

  • Geneva releases FOUR new rootstocks

Geneva releases FOUR new rootstocks

  • May 15th, 2010

This rootstock, commercialized as Geneva 214, is one of four newly released from the New York breeding program. Growers on tour with the International Fruit Tree Association waded deep snow to look them over at the Wittenbach farm in Belding, Michigan, in early March. Resistance to fireblight is one [...]

  • Moth poses little risk in Taiwan

Moth poses little risk in Taiwan

  • May 15th, 2010

Dr. Lisa Neven is studying the survival of codling moth larvae in tropical conditions.

There is little risk of codling moth larvae shipped in apples to Taiwan resulting in the pest becoming established in that country, research by Dr. Lisa Neven, insect physiologist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s research [...]

  • Good Job

Good Job

  • May 1st, 2010

Apple Blossom Queen Margaret Robinson presented a plaque to WSU Extension Educator Tim Smith when he was named Apple Citizen of the Year 2010.

Tim Smith is Apple Citizen of the Year
Tim Smith, a Washington State University Extension educator for the past 25 years, has been named Apple Citizen of [...]

  • Solving the woolly apple aphid

Solving the woolly apple aphid

  • May 1st, 2010

Washington Fruit and Produce Company planted alyssum between the rows of this new orchard to attract syrphid flies, which are good predators of woolly apple aphid.

Dain Craver’s plan to produce potted apple trees to sell to city residents was almost derailed by a bad infestation of woolly apple aphids.

Craver, [...]

Growers surveyed on pest practices

  • May 1st, 2010

Washington apple growers are adopting new pest ­management strategies and technologies including safer chemistries, in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency phaseout of ­azinphos-methyl (AZM-Guthion) in tree fruits. Because the new chemistries require more precise timing and better spray coverage, use of predictive models and improved application delivery [...]

  • Meeting the organic challenge

Meeting the organic challenge

  • May 1st, 2010

Harry and Jackie Hoch (center) gather in their orchard for a family photo on Easter weekend, where unusual 80-degree weather advanced the season, requiring sprays for disease control on the apricots and plums. With them are Harry’s mother, Jackie Senior, and their daughters Missy (far left) and Angi.
Photo [...]