Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

ADVERTISEMENT


Instant vineyard

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

These “super big” vines were planted in an Oregon vineyard earlier this year.
Neil Hauff

Imagine the labor savings if you could plant and establish a new vineyard without staking, tying, training, suckering, or using protective cartons

Read More

Jones of Washington

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Jack, left, and Greg Jones moved the Jones of Washington winery from Quincy to the J & S Crushing facility in Mattawa in 2008.

Don’t let the magnitude of Jones of Washington Vineyard and Winery fool

Read More

Nothing average about Jones

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

 

The tasting room for Jones of Washington wines has no Mediterranean architecture, marble floor, or exquisite wood for the tasting bar, nor expansive windows to showcase views of the vineyard. The focus at Jones of

Read More

Making wines in a big way

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Pinot Grigio grapes are being crushed. White and red grapes are received and crushed in separate areas at J & S Crushing.
Melissa Hansen

Doing things in a big way is nothing new to Jack Jones of

Read More

$60-million boost

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

A mechanical harvester is part of a major research project relating to production and marketing of stem-free sweet cherries.

More than $60 million dollars in grants have been awarded so far through the Specialty Crop Research

Read More

Grape industry goes after viruses

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Grapevine leafroll disease is easy to diagnose in red varieties, like this Cabernet Sauvignon vine, but more difficult in white varieties where the only symptom might be downward curling of leaves.

The Washington grape industry has

Read More

Bloom heading can improve yields

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

A water deficit of as little as 0.1 or 0.2 of an inch can cause shriveled tendrils and poor fruit set. These vines were part of Ste. Michelle Wine Estates’s irrigation trials at Canoe Ridge

Read More

Concord grapes, part of American culture

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Though Concord was generally accepted as being pure Vitis labrusca, horticulturists today believe it is a hybrid with another species and that most of the older American-type grapes involve more than one species. Ephraim Bull’s

Read More

Pay attention to vines at bloom

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Cabernet Sauvignon with (left) and without nitrogen deficiency during bloom.
Markus Keller

To a casual observer, a cluster thick with berries might forecast a bumper crop. But with fruit set, what you see is not necessarily what

Read More

Growing sought-after Syrah grapes

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Mike Sauer of Red Willow Vineyard was the first to plant Syrah wine grapes in Washington State.
Melissa Hansen

Syrah wine grapes are ideally suited to Washington State’s soils and climate, and several of the state’s wineries

Read More

Where should Syrah be planted?

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Syrah wine grapes can be successful in warm and cool sites in Washington State. However, there are a few locations where the red variety should not be planted, says winemaker Brennon Leighton.

When Rhone varietals, like

Read More

Field-grafting grapes not a sure thing

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Dick Boushey shows a cleft graft that he used to change a block of Semillon wine grapes over to Sauvignon Blanc.
melissa hansen

Field grafting wine grapes has successfully been done in Washington State. ­However, grape growers

Read More

Wine industry backs new center

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

The Washington Wine Commission’s commitment of $7.4 million towards the cost of building a Wine Science Center at Washington State University’s Tri-Cities campus gives the fundraising effort an important boost, says Dr. Thomas Henick-Kling, director

Read More

Small nursery has depth of selection

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Jeff Sample has more than 70 grape selections of clones and varieties in his Terroir Nouveaux Nurseries in Sunnyside, Washington.
Melissa Hansen

Pinot Noir 106 is the same as UCD 29 (University of California, Davis), while Pinot

Read More

What’s hot in grape varieties

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Jeff Sample has a small greenhouse that he uses to grow cuttings and increase the number of vines that he can plant from Foundation Plant Services. Sixty sticks of dormant wood yields about 100 plants.

Since

Read More

Quality wine by the glass

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

James Martin spent two years converting the ground flour of the old flour mill into a tasting room and production facility for Copa Di Vino wines. The milling machinery was left in place.

James Martin hopes

Read More

Eastern U.S. wine industry gets lift

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Tony Wolf, center, is director of the Alson H. Smith, Jr. Agricultural Research and Extension Center, a 124-acre site in Winchester, Virginia, devoted to research plantings.

More Americans are drinking more wine every year. As with

Read More

Grapes for Puget Sound

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Left to right, Top: Regent, Gruner Veltliner, Pinot Noir Precoce. Bottom: Golubok, Rondo

Field trials of cool climate wine grape cultivars are beginning to identify varieties of potential for Washington State’s Puget Sound. For some varieties,

Read More

Good Stuff

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

New spraying book
Dr. Andrew Landers’ new book Effective Vineyard Spraying is now available for purchase from Cornell University. Landers, who directs the application technology program at Cornell, has conducted sprayer workshops for growers from coast

Read More

Puget Sound potential

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Washington’s Puget Sound is not only picturesque, but it’s near major population centers.
SAN JJUAN VINEYARDS

Washington’s Puget Sound has long been associated with rain, and more rain—not a climate thought to be conducive to wine grape

Read More

Predicting grapevine cold hardiness

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Being able to predict the cold hardiness of grapes could help growers know how to respond when severe freezes occur.

Researchers at Washington State University are developing a computer model for predicting grapevine cold hardiness that

Read More

Growing grapes with less water

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Data on deficit irrigation treatments on juice and wine grapes will be collected by WSU’s Joan Davenport.

A broad research coalition has embarked on a comprehensive, five-year project to develop sustainable water management strategies for vineyards.

Read More

Vineyard water research details

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

The sustainable vineyard water management research project, directed by Dr. James Ayars, involves a team of more than 20 researchers, grower cooperators, extension educators, and industry members representing four western states.

The five-year, $562,000 water management

Read More

Fungicide tools and resistance management guidelines

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

As of spring 2011, growers in eastern Washington have several new fungicides at their disposal for managing powdery mildew.

For cherry growers, new products include Adament ­(tebuconazole + trifloxystrobin), Quash (metconazole), and Unicorn (tebuconazole + sulfur).

Four

Read More

Beauty with benefits

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

David James

Restoring native sagebrush steppe habitat in and near vineyards and wineries in central Washington could attract more than just beneficial insects to the vineyard. By serving as a home for butterflies, the vineyards and

Read More

Balancing nitrogen in grapes and wine

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Catherine Jones, middle, puts Merlot grapes through a destemmer under the watchful eye of her advisor Joan Davenport.

For both grape growers and winemakers, the status of nitrogen in the vineyard can make big differences in

Read More

When grapes need a drink

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Although wine grapes don’t need much water during the season, they need to drink frequently and at key times, says Dr. Markus Keller, viticulturist for Washington State ­University.

The following are average amounts of water that

Read More

Grower perspectives on grape irrigation

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

This grape shoot shows a vine actively growing as the tendrils are further out than the shoot tips and appear to be climbing.

Numerous tools are available to help wine grape growers monitor plant water use

Read More

When do grapevines need irrigation?

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Markus Keller says that regulated deficit irrigation can be beneficial for most red wine grape varieties, but timing of stress is important. During a field day last summer, he showed the drip system installed in

Read More

Washington needs to own the Syrah variety

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

The salvation to lagging wine sales of Syrah may be in Washington State owning the variety as it now does Riesling, says Bob Betz, who describes himself as an “unapologetic, unabashed ­supporter and lover of

Read More

Be patient with Syrah

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

The lack of consumer interest in Syrah wines is of keen interest to Washington’s wine industry. Some industry officials estimate there are 3,000 acres planted in the state, with many of the newer plantings just

Read More

Washington Syrah: Rising or falling star?

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Syrah was to be one of the stars in Washington State’s wine lineup. But something happened along the way to greatness, and wineries have watched Syrah wine sales drop and inventories build. In the short

Read More

A primer on Botrytis cinerea

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Dr. Wayne Wilcox of Cornell University says Botrytis cinerea as a weak pathogen that prefers injured, senescent tissue, such as old blossom parts and ripening fruit. The more ripe the fruit, the more susceptible it

Read More

Bunch rot strategy for 2011

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

PHOTO COURTESY OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY

For Washington grape growers who had a bunch rot problem in 2010, efforts to get rid of any carryover crop are worthwhile, says a New York plant pathologist. Growers should also

Read More

Botrytis comes to dry Washington

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Latent infections inside a cluster can take over the bunch by harvest time.
PHOTO COURTESY OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY

Last year’s cool season not only challenged growers and winemakers with slow fruit ripening, it also brought bunch rot

Read More

Will the new pest go after grapes?

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Grape growers learn to identify spotted wing drosophila at a Washington State Grape Society meeting.
Photo by Melissa Hansen

Preliminary tests conducted last fall indicate that Washington State grapes might not be attractive to the spotted wing

Read More

Watch for crown gall and vine decline

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Vineyardists in the Pacific Northwest have been relatively lucky regarding the number of grape diseases they have to worry about. But recent experiences indicate that Washington growers should also watch for diseases associated with vine

Read More

BUYER BEWARE: Certified may not be clean

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Recent Washington State grower experiences of finding disease in a vineyard planted with certified stock have highlighted the weaknesses of state plant health certification programs and the need for program improvement.

“We thought we had something

Read More

Good Point

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

At this year’s Washington Association of Wine Grape Growers’s annual meeting, we have a special session called “Getting Paid: Tools for Grape Growers.” The session is funded by a grant from the USDA Risk Management

Read More

Last Bite–The Comeback Kid

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

A typical Riesling vineyard in Germany’s Mosel region. Some of the steepest vineyards in the world are found in Germany.

The white Riesling grape, a Vitis vinifera variety that has played a dominant role in the

Read More

Rootstock effects on wine are minor

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Despite the discovery near Kennewick in 1894 of the destructive grapevine root pest phylloxera, the vast majority of Washington State’s vineyards continue to be planted to wine and juice grapes grown on their own roots.

Read More

Breaking the weed cycle

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Wapato, Washington, grape grower Mike Sauer has experience with replanting both wine and juice grapes. Wine grapes, when following wine grapes in a vineyard with wide spacing between vine rows, are relatively easy, but Concords

Read More

Replacing vines

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

The empty spaces in this vineyard are grafted vines that didn’t take. “A vineyard like this with a lot of holes has issues that have to be dealt with,” said Kevin Corliss.

Jerry Czebotar likens human

Read More

Stepping aside

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Tedd Wildman is busy loading grapes during harvest.

It would be easier to list the industry groups that Prosser, Washington’s Tedd Wildman has not been actively involved with than to list the ones he has chaired

Read More

Clean plant material fundamental

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

The young vines in grow tubes are replants due to disease-contaminated plant material.

When Tedd Wildman began planting lesser-known red wine grape varieties on Washington State’s Wahluke Slope ten years ago, he was careful to source

Read More

Should you graft or replant?

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

An example of a field-grafted vine.

Reasons to redevelop a vineyard vary—the vines may be the wrong variety, riddled with disease, or no longer productive. But when it’s time for a change, do you graft or

Read More

Wine is good for you

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Published January 15, 2011
Add health benefits to the list of what’s good about Washington State’s grape industry. Moderate consumption of alcohol—especially red wine, and to a lesser degree grape juice—really is good for you, says

Read More

Growing new grape leaders

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

In recent years, the annual meeting of the Washington Association of Wine Grape Growers has expanded its educational sessions and trade show to make it the biggest wine producers’ venue in the Pacific Northwest. More

Read More

Learn how to get paid

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Increasing numbers of growers are reporting difficulty in getting paid for their grapes, a result of the trickle effect that the down economy has had on the farm. To help growers improve their chances of

Read More

How to get paid for your grapes

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

The down economy has had a ripple effect on the wine grape industry. Fewer restaurant meals and reduced entertaining budgets have slowed wine sales, backed up inventories, and bankrupted some wineries and distributors. All too

Read More