How to harvest and store WA 38 (Cosmic Crisp) apples

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Breaking the weed cycle

  • February 1st, 2011

Wapato, Washington, grape grower Mike Sauer has experience with replanting both wine and juice grapes. Wine grapes, when following wine grapes in a vineyard with wide spacing between vine rows, are relatively easy, but Concords following Concords are a ­different problem, he says.

Sauer’s early wine grape vineyards were planted [...]

Marketers line up exclusive apples

  • February 1st, 2011

Aurora
Auvil Fruit Company
For a long time, Auvil Fruit Company had been on the lookout for a yellow, good-tasting dessert apple to add to its lineup of varieties, which includes Gala, Fuji, Honeycrisp, and Cripps Pink, but not a single Red or Golden Delicious apple.

Then along came Aurora, [...]

  • Stepping aside

Stepping aside

  • February 1st, 2011

Tedd Wildman is busy loading grapes during harvest.

It would be easier to list the industry groups that Prosser, Washington’s Tedd Wildman has not been actively involved with than to list the ones he has chaired or served as an officer or board member.

In addition to serving as chair of [...]

  • Organic bubble hasn’t burst

Organic bubble hasn’t burst

  • February 1st, 2011

The entry of Walmart into organic fruit retailing five years ago helped fuel the demand for organic fruit, and demand is still growing despite the economic recession, according to David Granatstein, Washington State University’s organic tree fruit specialist. Acreage of organic pears and cherries in Washington State dropped between [...]

  • Clean plant material fundamental

Clean plant material fundamental

  • February 1st, 2011

The young vines in grow tubes are replants due to disease-contaminated plant material.

When Tedd Wildman began planting lesser-known red wine grape varieties on Washington State’s Wahluke Slope ten years ago, he was careful to source plant ­material from certified nurseries. But not careful enough.

At the time, certified plant material [...]

  • New varieties are slow to be planted

New varieties are slow to be planted

  • February 1st, 2011

Laimburg Research Center’s Daniele Bona, left, shows the differences between high and low elevation in their variety trials.

Golden Delicious is the major variety grown in the South Tyrol, but a slow shift to newer varieties and improved clones of traditional ones is taking hold. In the last four years, [...]

Rootstock effects on wine are minor

  • February 1st, 2011

Despite the discovery near Kennewick in 1894 of the destructive grapevine root pest phylloxera, the vast majority of Washington State’s vineyards continue to be planted to wine and juice grapes grown on their own roots. While juice grapes are relatively tolerant of the insect, European wine grapes can succumb [...]

Good Point

  • February 1st, 2011

At this year’s Washington Association of Wine Grape Growers’s annual meeting, we have a special session called “Getting Paid: Tools for Grape Growers.” The session is funded by a grant from the USDA Risk Management Agency through the Washington Wine Industry Foundation. It will be presented three times with [...]

  • Replacing vines

Replacing vines

  • February 1st, 2011

The empty spaces in this vineyard are grafted vines that didn’t take. “A vineyard like this with a lot of holes has issues that have to be dealt with,” said Kevin Corliss.

Jerry Czebotar likens human productivity to a Concord vineyard’s productivity. “Half of my 100-acre vineyard was planted in [...]

Rootstocks, varieties, and tree training

  • February 1st, 2011

A research and demonstration orchard near Ferrara, Italy, is a horticulturist’s dream—a 25-acre plot to study rootstocks, varieties, and training systems for pears, apples, and cherries that’s funded by a private foundation without worry of budget cutbacks. And, how about a $3.5-million donation just for pears for the next [...]

  • Should you graft or replant?

Should you graft or replant?

  • February 1st, 2011

An example of a field-grafted vine.

Reasons to redevelop a vineyard vary—the vines may be the wrong variety, riddled with disease, or no longer productive. But when it’s time for a change, do you graft or replant?

Many of the juice grape vineyards in Washington State were planted in the 1960s; [...]

  • Why Italian orchards are so productive

Why Italian orchards are so productive

  • January 15th, 2011

Dr. Martin Thalheimer says the South Tyrol’s high productivity in apples is due to a combination of factors—uniform, high-density plantings, a strong extension service, and adoption of modern orchard management techniques.

Published January 15, 2011
The high apple yields in Italy’s South Tyrol region are a result of improved management [...]