Techniques & benefits of a fruit wall

Lower costs and better vigor control make them attractive for high-density plantings.

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  • Weather affects grape crops

Weather affects grape crops

  • January 1st, 2010

These Concord grapes near Quincy, Washington, were hit by the early October freeze and left unharvested.

Weather adversely affected the 2009 juice and wine grape crops coast to coast. Agricultural economist Trent Ball told Washington State Grape Society members recently that an October freezeone of the earliest on recordimpacted grape [...]

  • Strategies for Success

Strategies for Success

  • January 1st, 2010

Jim and Rena Doornink planted this block of Jazz apples last spring. Jazz will fill a gap in their harvest schedule between Honeycrisp and Fuji, keeping their crew busy all summer long.

During his 35 years as an orchardist, Jim Doornink has always enjoyed strategizing about how to run a [...]

A new game

  • January 1st, 2010

New apple varieties from Washington State University’s breeding program present opportunities for the state’s growers, said Tom Auvil, research horticulturist with the Washington Tree Fruit Research Commission.

WSU has just released the first variety from its breeding program, WA 2, and has more in the pipeline. These varieties will be [...]

  • Family branches into organics

Family branches into organics

  • January 1st, 2010

Alberto Carleti planted this hillside orchard after seeing orchards in Sunnyside, Washington.

Argentine cherry grower Alberto Carleti partnered with a friend in Washington State to establish his latest cherry orchard at Tunuyn in Mendoza.

Carleti, who has visited Washington, said he was inspired by orchards he saw at Sunnyside and planted [...]

  • Current planting trends

Current planting trends

  • January 1st, 2010

Golden Delicious plantings have dropped to their lowest level in 25 years.

Fuji has replaced Gala as the most popular variety to plant in Washington. Around 23 percent of the trees budded for planting next spring are Fuji, a survey of nursery tree sales shows. Many growers are replacing older [...]

Quality starts with the vine

  • January 1st, 2010

For more than 30 years, Jim Holmes has worked to better manage his vineyard canopy by following the advice of consultants and trying different training systems. What he’s learned through decades of experience is to focus on managing the vine well and not worry so much about the canopy.

Holmes, [...]

  • Last Bite

Last Bite

Perham Fruit Company used these five labels during the 1920s and 1930s.

Some of the most beautiful and sought-after fruit labels that collectors desire are the old Perham labels. Illustrated here are the five original company labels from the 1920s and 1930s. There are variations of each label. Swan, Tulip, [...]

  • Research viewpoint

Research viewpoint

  • December 1st, 2009

Soft fruit breeder Ralph Scorza and colleagues developed this pitless plum.

Continuing budget constraints at U.S. universities will result in fewer scientists and less research for growers to draw upon, predicts Larry Gut, entomologist at Michigan State University.

“People are being laid off and let go,” Gut said. “I’m afraid it [...]

  • Cultivating beneficials

Cultivating beneficials

  • December 1st, 2009

Mike Omeg checks for beneficial insects in goldenrod plants in an insectary alongside a Regina cherry block. He’s watched by (from left) Drew Merritt and Kristin Currin of Humble Roots Farm & Nursery at Mosier, Oregon, and Gwendolyn Ellen of Oregon State

Oregon cherry grower Mike Omeg is worried about [...]

  • Allow parasites to control leafhopper

Allow parasites to control leafhopper

  • December 1st, 2009

A decade ago, the western grape leafhopper was known to exist in British Columbia only on the east side of the Okanagan Valley, from Penticton south to the Canada-U.S. border. Today, reports of the pest are coming from the west side of the valley and north of Penticton, highlighting [...]

  • Field sorting could bring a bonus

Field sorting could bring a bonus

  • December 1st, 2009

The recently planted WSU research orchard will allow study of planting designs for the future.

One of the new technologies Washington State University entomologist Dr. Jay Brunner expects and hopes to see in the next decade is automated sorting of fruit in the field. Apart from reducing a grower’s costs [...]

  • Growing nitrogen on the side

Growing nitrogen on the side

  • December 1st, 2009

Dr. Steve Fransen points out that the ladino clover had pink root nodules, indicating that it was fixing nitrogen.

As commercial nitrogen fertilizers become more expensive, and potentially more limited in supply, the idea of growing fertilizer in the orchard is being explored.

Quincy, Washington, fruit grower Warren Morgan, who is [...]