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Visiting scientist from Australia Jason Smith, left, and Washington State University's Markus Keller test a pressure vessel for grapevine roots.

Visiting scientist from Australia Jason Smith, left, and Washington State University’s Markus Keller test a pressure vessel for grapevine roots.

A number of benefits to industry have resulted from Washington State’s grape and wine research program. The following is a brief list:

  • Grape powdery mildew. Dr. Gary Grove identified the overwintering source of Washington’s powdery mildew and developed models and cost-effective control programs.
  • Insects. Dr. David James provided the basis for a sustainable pest control program, expanding knowledge about insect biology, beneficial insects, and impact of pesticides on beneficials.
  • Grapevine leafroll virus. Several researchers have identified virus strains prevalent in Washington and control programs.
  • Stuck fermentations. Dr. Charles Edwards has contributed to industry knowledge about the interaction between yeast fermentations and lactic acid bacteria and the nutritional requirements for healthy yeast fermentations.
  • Grape cold hardiness. Several researchers have been involved with cold hardiness, developing a program for monitoring grape bud and cane cold hardiness and communicating it with the industry. Researchers have also investigated the impact of irrigation, nitrogen fertilization, and crop load on cold hardiness and wine quality.
  • Deficit irrigation. Drs. Bob Evans and Robert Wample developed the basis for current regulated deficit irrigation strategies to optimize wine quality.

Source: Dr. Wade Wolfe