Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page
Nick Parker, Port of Quincy Terminal Mananger, parks a newer train shuttle that was purchased when the Cold Train service was launched in 2010. The service line was purchased by Federated Railways, Inc., and the company plans to expand the fleet. (TJ Mullinax/Good Fruit Grower file photo)

Nick Parker, Port of Quincy Terminal Mananger, parks a newer train shuttle that was bought when the Cold Train service in Quincy, Washington, was launched in 2010. The service line was purchased by Federated Railways, Inc., and the company plans to expand the fleet. (TJ Mullinax/Good Fruit Grower file photo)

Federated Railways, Inc., an affiliate of Federated Capital Corporation, Farmington Hills, Michigan, will acquire the assets of Rail Logistics, including its Cold Train Express Intermodal Service.

The new subsidiary will be called Federated Cold Train and will conduct business as Cold Train.  The company will maintain its current staff, including Steve Lawson as president and CEO, and its headquarters in Overland Park, Kansas.

Federated Capital Corporation’s holdings include a variety of service, leasing, and railroad assets including the Great Lakes Central Railroad in Michigan and Federated Railcar.

Rail Logistics launched the Cold Train Express Intermodal Service in partnership with BNSF Railway from the Port of Quincy Intermodal Terminal in Washington State in April of 2010, and then more recently began a similar service from Portland, Oregon.

In 2013, it expanded its refrigerated container fleet to more than 400 Hyundai 53-foot containers and added new destinations on the East Coast.  Cold Train now delivers refrigerated cargo from Washington and Oregon to 20 Midwestern and eastern states and Ontario, Canada.

Louis P. Ferris, president of Federated Capital Corporation, said Federated Capital plans to add at least 1,000 more containers to the Cold Train fleet over the next five years.

Read more about the Cold Train: Since early in 2010, more produce–including apples–has been hauled east by rail.