March 1st 2009 Issue

Monitoring, managing codling moth clearly and precisely

By |January 21st, 2014|

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A research report from Alan Knight, USDA–Wapato; Loys Hawkins and Kathleen McNamara, Bear Creek Orchards, Oregon; and
Rick Hilton, Oregon State

Clearwing moth spreading

By |March 1st, 2009|

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Left: Adult apple clearwing. Right: Larvae burrow under tree bark for almost two years, feeding on the cambium

WSU Decision Aid System updated

By |March 1st, 2009|

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To see the Decision Aid System online, visit entomology.tfrec.wsu .edu/das. by Vince P. Jones, Brad Petit,

Learning new tactics

By |March 1st, 2009|

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Dr. Jay Brunner, Washington State University entomologist, right, explains the IPM strategies for control of codling moth and

Rodent bait station

By |March 1st, 2009|

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Example of the do-it-yourself bait station. Growers can easily build their own nontoxic bait station for

Putting bats to work

By |March 1st, 2009|

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Bats eat a variety of night-flying insects, including codling moth. Tree fruit

Trapping unwanted birds

By |March 1st, 2009|

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Mike Omeg shows the sparrow repeater trap to growers during a workshop last fall at Omeg Orchards.

Making it pay

By |March 1st, 2009|

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Growers attending a beneficial bird workshop at Omeg Orchards, The Dalles, Oregon, examine a barn owl box. Note

Bringing back bluebirds

By |March 1st, 2009|

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The western bluebird is an insectivore, with more than two-thirds of its diet coming from insects.

Good Job

By |March 1st, 2009|

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In an industry that espouses change, Canadian Don Claridge is somewhat of a maverick. The 57-year-old apple grower, who

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