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Pest Control

Featured stories about pest control appear in this issue.

Ballot shows support for SIR program

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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British Columbia fruit growers have voted to continue their support for the Canadian province’s innovative but costly codling moth control program. Of 435 eligible

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The sweet “smell” of pest control

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Exposing plants to certain chemicals can arouse them to release their own aromas to warn each other of danger and beckon insect “bodyguards” to defend

Small made no small contribution

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Orchardist Jim Small of Entiat, Washington, was honored for serving 28 years on the board of the Washington Growers Clearing House Association. Small,

Soft pesticides can be hard on beneficials

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Some of the new “soft” pesticides that have been developed in recent years are not so soft on beneficial insects and mites as first supposed,

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New mites detected in Washington vineyards

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Wine grape growers in Mattawa and the Yakima and Columbia Valleys were concerned in the summer of 2005 to find their vine leaves turning a

Life after organophosphates

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Suitable alternatives to organophosphates are available for Western cherry fruit fly, says a U.S. Department of Agriculture scientist. But achieving complete control with the new

Letters to the editor

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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CRISP & COLDThe February 1, 2006, Good Fruit Grower made history. The revolutionary trends in niche variety, and other apple growing are challenging and sudden.

New controls for cherry pests

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Oregon State University scientists, in the search for more selective alternatives to traditional broad-spectrum pesticides, are testing a variety of new reduced-risk materials to assess

Cherry fruit fly bait attracts large following

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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A new bait for controlling cherry fruit fly probably saved Washington State growers close to a million dollars last season, according to Tim Smith, Washington

No one likes cheap fruit

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Canadian growers who are upset by low apple prices should not get angry at retailers, because retailers don’t like the situation either, produce consultant Michael

Pest control costs worry growers

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Orchardists participating in a research trial that evaluated reduced-risk pest management say that the reduced-risk practices are effective, but they are more expensive and require

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Growers bear gifts and messages for legislators

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Thirteen of the 25 largest apple- and pear-producing companies in the United States are in Washington State. That’s one of the messages Jon Wyss delivered

Western Washington growers sell direct

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Apple growers in western Washington are realizing that their future does not lie in selling their apples through major packers to the wholesale market.

RAMP focuses on reduced-risk pest controls

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Apples and peaches, high-value crops in eastern United States, were the focus of a regional research project aimed at finding solutions to problems resulting from

Hort Council fills technical issues position

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Deborah Carter is the new technical issues manager for the Northwest Horticultural Council, which is based in Yakima, Washington. She comes to her new job

In Our View

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Since the federal court decision in March 2003, the Washington Apple Commission has gone through some dramatic changes. The decision of District Court Judge Edward

Southern Hemisphere apple crop down

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Representatives of Southern Hemisphere tree fruit producers report that their 2006 apple crop is 8 percent smaller than last year’s, but their pear crop is

Grants available for mowing prunings

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Cost-share grants are available to growers in north central Washington State for disposing of their annual pruning by means other than burning. The Washington

More pears expected from Argentina

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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The fruit importer Oppenheimer Group of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, expects to bring more pears into the United States from Argentina this season because the

Controlling apple and peach pests without OPs

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Results from a reduced-risk pest management research trial in eastern states show that high-quality tree fruit can be grown without organophosphates, but growers can expect

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Lodi rules

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Frustrated by low returns compared to their counterparts in the Napa Valley, wine grape growers in Lodi, California, are attempting to add value to their

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EPA offers help to growers

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Scattered across the country, tucked away in university extension offices and government labs, a coterie of regulatory scientists are looking for ways to reduce pesticide

Partnering with environmentalists

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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The Lodi-Woodbridge Winegrape Commission worked with Protected Harvest, the third-party certifier, for nearly two years in developing the Lodi Rules for Sustainable Winegrowing.

Lorsban implicated in pesticide exposure tests

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Early season is when orchard workers are most likely to be exposed to cholinesterase-depressing pesticides, judging by Washington State’s cholinesterase-monitoring program, and the pesticide Lorsban

Survival means growing better fruit with less labor

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Many Washington State tree fruit growers have been slow to adopt technology in the orchard so far, but unless they start making significant changes, their

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Apple maggot continues to spread

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Apple maggot is not difficult to control, but it is a serious problem if found in orchards because it’s a quarantine pest.

Apple maggot is native

Rootstocks show resistance to replant disease

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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A rootstock breeding program that has released seven fireblight-resistant rootstocks shows no signs of slowing down. Thousands more genotypes are in the pipeline for testing

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Obliquebanded leafroller displaces pandemis

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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The obliquebanded leafroller has displaced pandemis as the primary leafroller pest in north central Washington.

Mike Doerr, entomologist with Washington State University in Wenatchee, said that

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Health message gains importance

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Just a few years ago, all that buyers cared about was the appearance of the apples they bought. “You never talked about taste when you

You can’t stop drift, but you can reduce the risks

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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All sprays drift, but pesticide users can reduce the impact of drift by using lower-risk pesticides. Dr. Alan Felsot, environmental toxicologist with Washington

People can afford to pay more for food

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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People have more cash to spend than ever before, yet spend a shrinking proportion of their income on food. John Mackey,

Apple attractant not found yet

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Researchers have been unable to duplicate whatever it is in apples that attracts codling moths. Dr. Peter Landolt, research leader at the U.S. Department

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Why not fresh-cut pears?

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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The equivalent of more than a million boxes of apples were sold in the form of fresh slices last year. Advancements in quality control and

Breakthrough in codling moth control

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Dr. Doug Light with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Western Regional Research Center in Albany, California, and Dr. Alan Knight with the USDA’s Agricultural Research

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Bin sled improves harvest efficiency

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Sometimes the simplest approach is the most cost effective. An inexpensive sled used for tree fruit harvest has reduced bruising and increased efficiency, says a

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Target pear psylla early

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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The most effective time to control pear psylla is early in the season, Washington State University entomologist Dr. John Dunley stresses. The pest develops through

Direct sales boost LynOaken Farms’s profits

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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To stay competitive in the fruit industry, some get larger to achieve economies of scale. Others, like one western New York State producer, find ways

Psylla is everyone’s problem

March 1st, 2006|0 Comments

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Pear psylla is not an individual orchardist’s problem—it is a neighborhood issue. The pest disperses in the winter and flies back into orchards in