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Crop Management & Growth Regulators

Featured stories about crop management and growth regulators appear in this issue.

Scientists hope to improve cropping of Regina

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Oregon State University scientists are hoping to find ways to improve fruit set and productivity in Regina cherries, a new sweet cherry variety with exceptional

Apple group looks into marketing orders

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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The Washington Apple Growers Marketing Association is looking into how the volume of Washington apples going to market might be controlled through a federal marketing

Pest control important in market access

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Since a single live codling moth in a box of fruit has the potential to close a major export market, efforts are being intensified to

New York to delay apple crop forecast

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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The New York apple industry will be more cautious in estimating its crop this year. Last year, the industry’s first official estimate of 27 million

Match cherry varieties with rootstocks

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Crop management of sweet cherries starts even before trees are planted. Matching productive characteristics of variety to the vigor of the rootstock and using

Economists called on to discuss profitability

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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A new committee of the North Central Washington Fieldmen’s Association is bringing in speakers to talk to its members about the economics of fruit production.

The

Growers report success with hornfaced bee

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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A Michigan orchardist had nearly twice the volume of fruit in his sweet cherry blocks last year after using hornfaced bees for pollination. It

Fruit size matters

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Lots of small fruit or fewer big fruit—which makes more money for a grower? For answers, growers should analyze their cherry packout reports, suggests an

Predicting wine grape crops

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Crop estimation, an important practice for vineyardists and wineries, can be accurately done using a modified lag phase procedure developed for Washington State conditions, says

Progress made in cherry thinning research

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Scientists are making headway in the search for effective chemical thinning agents for cherries, though specific recommendations aren’t available yet. Chemical thinning research

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Grape growers thin to reduce crop and boost sugar

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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With juice grape prices so low, it’s hard to imagine growers would even consider spending money to thin their crop. But the practice paid off

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Hornfaced bees

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Hornfaced bees are solitary, which means that instead of having queens and workers, each female mates, makes her own nest cells of mud, collects food

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Hang time pits growers against winemakers

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Mentioning the phrase “hang time” in a room of winemakers and wine grape growers is a sure-fire way to generate debate. Washington State’s wine industry

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A bee that likes cold weather?

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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A bee that seems to have a penchant for flying in cool and cloudy weather is causing quite a buzz among scientists and orchardists, who

Canadian growers pitch a national replant program

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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There’s growing momentum behind a national replant program for orchards and vineyards in Canada. Modeled on the successful replant program that has operated in

Boosting yields of Balaton cherries

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Pollen delivery and availability appear to be key to improving fruit set of Balaton cherries, a new sweet-tart cherry that holds promise to become a

Rust mite is becoming a bigger pest in pears

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Although mites don’t have the same pest status as codling moth or pear psylla, they are becoming more difficult to control in some areas because

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Gutzwiler retires to focus on growing cherries

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Norm Gutzwiler of Wenatchee, Washington, has retired after 33 years as a field horticulturist, though he plans to keep busy farming his own cherry orchards

Plantain is summer host for rosy apple aphid

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Rosy apple aphids leave apple trees in the summer to live on plantain, studies by Dr. Elizabeth Beers and colleagues at Washington State University show.

More apples shipped to Taiwan this season

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Fears that the Taiwan market might be closed to U.S. apples because of another codling moth detection seem to have resulted in high volumes of

Is your marketer exploiting the opportunities?

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Growers should take the time to visit their warehouse and learn more about how their fruit is being sold, Steve Lutz suggests. Lutz, former

Growing, packing, marketing must work together

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Peter Verbrugge, head of a vertically integrated fruit company in Yakima, Washington, sees growing, packing, and marketing as three legs of a stool.

“If one is

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Fibers, flakes and globs

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Mating disruption of codling moth, using hand-applied pheromone dispensers, is working well, but other ways of dispensing pheromone are being tested, including fibers, flakes, and

Marketer recommends percentage sales commission

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Washington State is one of the few fruit-producing regions in the United States where the marketers are paid a fixed sum, rather than a percentage

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Taking the “art” out of pruning

March 15th, 2006|0 Comments

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Orchard systems must evolve into highly efficient systems if growers are to stay competitive and profitable, says a Washington State University scientist.

Cherry growing in the