Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

gfg-portraits-richard

After growing up on a Michigan dairy farm, Richard Lehnert began writing about farming in 1962, while still a junior studying journalism at Michigan State University. He worked at newspapers for a year before joining the staff of Michigan Farmer, where he spent 26 years, the last 15 as chief editor. He won several national awards for writing and photography.

After 1991, he worked as a freelance writer for national farm magazines, a newsletter editor, a livestock information officer at Michigan State University, and as a specialized writer about fruit and vegetable production.

He joined the staff of Good Fruit Grower in 2010. Based in Michigan, he primarily provided articles about fruit production from the eastern side of North America.

Read his stories: Story Index

My Recent Articles

  • 6b9693faf86b02fc804148c7dd8e5a80

State finalizes rules to kill maggots before shipping compost

July 8th, 2016|0 Comments

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Washington state regulators have finalized special permit requirements for composters seeking to transport feed stocks

  • BlackStemBorer-4

The growing threat of black stem borer

December 22nd, 2015|0 Comments

Years after invading from Asia, the insect is emerging as an apple tree pest.

  • VineProtectionRL-1a-feat

Protect vines from the cold

December 17th, 2015|0 Comments

Burying a spare cane provides insurance against very hard winters.

  • RootPruning1 copy

Root pruning is making a comeback

November 24th, 2015|1 Comment

Old practice finds new application by solving modern problems in apples.

  • Concord2Tier-2 copy

More profits from Concords

November 13th, 2015|0 Comments

Experimental design doubled Concord grape yields last year.

  • ConcordBeltRL-3x

Tough times on the concord belt

November 13th, 2015|0 Comments

Growers facing difficulties with both juice and wine grapes.

  • rubymac090914mde

Looking for good sports

October 23rd, 2015|0 Comments

Michigan State researcher thinks mutations will help identify genes governing apple quality traits.

  • BeforeYouPushRL-7x-e copy

Before you push trees

October 23rd, 2015|0 Comments

Older orchards can be repurposed to new uses or topworked to new varieties.

  • StoringHoneycrisp1c copy

Crucial tips to store Honeycrisp

October 8th, 2015|0 Comments

Treated properly, stored Honeycrisp can maintain quality nine months and longer.

  • IMG_5987

Ups and downs of global production

October 8th, 2015|0 Comments

Canada has the shortest apple crop in 20 years, while Mexico expects to almost tie the record.

  • honeycrispRootstockTrials2014GFG copy

Designer rootstocks

September 23rd, 2015|0 Comments

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

At Van Acker Farms in Williamson, New York, the owners are transitioning from growing apples

  • Mike Wade

Mike Wade is new chair of U.S. Apple Association

August 26th, 2015|1 Comment

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

The U.S. Apple Association added several new members to its directorship in August.

The chairmanship moved

  • ProcessingApplesCoeneSidebarRL-3

Growers transition to fresh market apples

August 24th, 2015|0 Comments

Growers are moving from processing to fresh apple varieties, but it takes time.

  • Gala and Honeycrisp cooling

U.S. apple growers expect smaller crop

August 21st, 2015|0 Comments

USApple estimate at 234 million; down about 41 million from 2014

  • outlook2015_banner

First day observations from the U.S. Apple outlook conference

August 20th, 2015|0 Comments

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Richard Lehnert, Good Fruit Grower associate editor, is attending the U.S. Apple Association crop outlook

Processed apples have a future

August 20th, 2015|0 Comments

While fresh is all the rage, processing varieties won’t disappear overnight—and maybe never.