Insects and mites

Make the most of biocontrol

By |March 6th, 2015|

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Beneficial insects and mites can play a role in controlling key orchard pests if they’re not exposed to harmful pesticides.

Codling moth mating disruption reaches a milestone

By |March 5th, 2015|

Mating disruption of codling moth is used in 90 percent of all apples and pears grown in Washington State.

Let us (not) spray

By |March 3rd, 2015|

Entomologists test alternative ways of applying plant protection materials to trees.

New focus on leafhoppers

By |March 2nd, 2015|

Growers should add 20 percent to their count when using a hand lens on leafhoppers.

Living with spotted wing drosophila

By |March 1st, 2015|

Five years later, what have we learned?

Swiss scientists test nets

By |March 1st, 2015|

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Swiss scientists have been testing netting as a way to exclude spotted wing drosophila from cherry orchards.

Researchers at the Breitenhof

Predatory mite comes to light

By |February 27th, 2015|

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The shift from broad-spectrum organophosphates to new classes of pesticides that are more selective appears to have caused a shift

Tart cherries threatened

By |February 26th, 2015|

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Entomologists in Michigan are still trying to determine whether spotted wing drosophila will be a significant tart cherry pest.

“We were

SWD research continues

By |February 25th, 2015|

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Great progress has been made in the last five years in learning about spotted wing drosophila, but much more is

Concrete support: 2014 IFTA Italy

By |February 5th, 2015|

Across South Tyrol, growers use posts made of concrete, rather than wood.

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