Insects and mites

Few bees in vineyards

By |March 25th, 2015|

Grape pest practices in Washington aren’t harming bees.

Lanternfly targeted for eradication

By |March 23rd, 2015|

Efforts to eliminate the invasive spotted lanternfly will begin this spring in Pennsylvania.

Beetle biocontrol

By |March 11th, 2015|

New research improves prospects of plum curculio control using nematodes.

Search continues for stinkbug predators

By |March 9th, 2015|

Will brown marmorated stinkbug take hold in desert climates?

Is biocontrol beating the bug?

By |March 8th, 2015|

Stinkbug damage in mid-Atlantic orchards was less last year, restoring hope for the future of IPM.

Survey finds no invasive grape moths

By |March 7th, 2015|

However, grape phylloxera was detected for the first time in a Wenatchee, Washington, vineyard.

Make the most of biocontrol

By |March 6th, 2015|

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page

Beneficial insects and mites can play a role in controlling key orchard pests if they’re not exposed to harmful pesticides.

Codling moth mating disruption reaches a milestone

By |March 5th, 2015|

Mating disruption of codling moth is used in 90 percent of all apples and pears grown in Washington State.

Let us (not) spray

By |March 3rd, 2015|

Entomologists test alternative ways of applying plant protection materials to trees.

New focus on leafhoppers

By |March 2nd, 2015|

Growers should add 20 percent to their count when using a hand lens on leafhoppers.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePrint this page