• Peach growers challenges

Peach growers challenges

  • September 1st, 2013

Growing peaches is getting easier in some ways, harder in others, a rather normal description of many orchardists’ efforts. Take two steps forward, then one back, and call that progress.

Clemson University professor of horticulture Dr. Greg Reighard talked about the challenges peach growers face during the International Fruit Tree [...]

Five ways to make sure people eat fewer peaches

  • July 1st, 2013

1
Grow just one variety. Growing one variety will limit your marketing season and the number of times consumers can come back to buy more peaches.

On the other hand, growers who want to sell lots of peaches will select multiple varieties that will ripen over a six- to eight-week [...]

  • Marked for progress

Marked for progress

  • July 1st, 2013

The four-year, $14.4 million RosBREED plant breeding project, funded in 2009 under the Specialty Crop Research Initiative, is coming to a new stage, winding down, wrapping up, summarizing, and telling people what’s been accomplished. But it’s also ramping up to convince the public to continue the project—because there’s still [...]

Winning orchard designs

  • July 1st, 2013

After four years of collecting data, Penn State University horticulturalist Dr. Jim Schupp has arrived at some conclusions about how peach growers should grow peaches to make the best possible returns.

“All our systems made money, but some made more than others,” he said of the trials comparing four styles [...]

  • The path to commercialization

The path to commercialization

  • July 1st, 2013

For seven years now, Rutgers University of New Jersey and Adams County Nursery in Aspers, Pennsylvania, have been working under a “formal relationship” in which the nursery brings new fruit selections developed by the university into commercial channels.

Not much was said about it until this year, when Rutgers’ extension [...]

Career comes to late fruition

  • June 1st, 2013

For more than two decades, Dr. Tom Toyama quietly got on with his work as stone fruit breeder at Washington State University.

Though no variety was released during his tenure from 1963 to 1985, his work has had a significant impact on the Northwest cherry industry. Ten of his cherry [...]