June 2010 Issue

The organized orchard

By |June 1st, 2010|

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Each tree is allowed to have only one limb on each wire, and the limb is headed halfway to the

Saving water and energy

By |June 1st, 2010|

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Pictured checking a new meter station are members of The Dalles Irrigation District’s Save Water Save Energy project planning team

New rules govern Michigan irrigators

By |June 1st, 2010|

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Last July, new rules in Michigan required most would-be irrigators to get permission to withdraw water either from groundwater using

Mulches can conserve water

By |June 1st, 2010|

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Research in the Pacific Northwest suggests that mulch placed in the tree row can cut a young apple tree’s water

Bringing the desert back

By |June 1st, 2010|

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Small plastic cage sleeves were used to protect the native seedlings from herbivores like rabbits.

Eastern Washington vineyards, with their scant

Foremen learn to supervise

By |June 1st, 2010|

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The Washington Farm Bureau, through Dan Fazio, sponsored a couple of two-day foreman training seminars, one in Mt. Vernon, the

The instant orchard

By |June 1st, 2010|

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Dale Goldy explains how large branches are removed and upright branches tied down to prevent competition with the central leader.

Tracking labor costs

By |June 1st, 2010|

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This labor tracking program uses a scanning device to read a worker’s bar coded identification.

Technology has brought sophisticated pest management

Do you know your labor costs?

By |June 1st, 2010|

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Labor tracking programs help growers know their labor costs in near real-time, instead of after the pay period.

Specialty crop agriculture

Tracking prevents favoritism

By |June 1st, 2010|

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The real advantage that University of California’s ­Gregorio Billikopf sees from labor tracking programs is improvement in productivity by strengthening

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